synaesthesia

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synaesthesia

(sĭn′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
Variant of synesthesia.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting the usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character or localization, e.g., color hearing, color taste.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

synaesthesia

The phenomenon in which stimulations of one sense modality produces the effect of stimulation of another. Thus, a person may consistently experience a particular letter of the alphabet, or a musical tone, as a particular colour.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

synaesthesia 

Phenomenon in which the stimulation of one of the senses produces a response from another sensory modality. Example: seeing the colour red when a particular sound is heard. See modality.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

syn·es·the·si·a

(sin'es-thē'zē-ă)
A condition in which a stimulus, in addition to exciting usual and normally located sensation, gives rise to a subjective sensation of different character.
Synonym(s): synaesthesia.
[syn- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The results in Groups 1 (synaesthetes) and 2 (naive control) showed the typical presence of a reliable decrease in RT between 0 and 1 repetition trials and the lack of a further decrease between 1 and 2 repetition trials.
In Groups 1 (synaesthetes) and 2 (naive control), the switch cost decreased with RSI, but although it was still significant with long RSI (residual cost) in Group 2, there was no residual cost for the synaesthete participants (G1).
The results can be summarized in the following way: the synaesthetes' data pattern is similar to that of the colored-numbers control group (naive control) in the short RSI condition (i.e., task-switch costs and no further decrease in RT with more task repetitions), but is similar to the white-numbers control group (trained control) in the long RSI condition (i.e., no task-switch costs).
The trained group (described in Methods) carried out the color tasks in the same way as synaesthetes A and B, whereas another group of six participants carried out the color task in the same way as synaesthetes C and D (that is, three participants indicated whether the color was yellow, while the other three indicated whether the color was red).
Once the equivalence between control groups was established (that is, the two groups were interchangeable and the global pattern of results, mainly regarding interactions, did not change), we decided to consider four participants who performed the reduced version of the task as the naive control group (G2), while the trained control group (G3) was formed by four subjects, two from the sub-group that simulated synaesthetes A and B and two from the sub-group that simulated synaesthetes C and D.
When N., a digit-color synaesthete, views white digits, each number elicits a photism (a visual experience of a specific color).
American neurologist Richard Cytowic says a synaesthete's experience forms the building blocks of perception, adding: "They get a sampling of perception at an earlier stage, before it becomes separated."
True synaesthetes will get nearly 100% accurate recall over a period of months and years.
We just don't know,' he said.: Are you a synaesthete?:Around one in every 1,000 people has synaesthesia - a neurological condition in which two or more of the senses, normally experienced separately, are experienced simultaneously.
In synaesthetes, the part of the brain that gi ves our sense of smell came into play when the verbal area was in use.