sympatric

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Related to sympatry: speciation, Sympatric speciation

sympatric

(sĭm-păt′rĭk)
adj.
1. Occupying the same or overlapping geographic areas. Used of organisms, especially populations of the same or closely related species.
2. Occurring among populations having such a distribution: sympatric speciation.

sym·pat′ri·cal·ly adv.
sym′pat·ry (sĭm′păt′rē, -pə-trē) n.

sympatric

(of a population of organisms) occurring together in the same geographical area. The term is used to describe the geographical distribution of organisms which either coincide or overlap. Compare ALLOPATRIC.
References in periodicals archive ?
An alternative explanation is that the evolution of habitat partitioning may not be a recent phenomenon, but, rather, evolved in the ancestors of the two lineages when they first came into sympatry in Cuba.
The pattern of stronger prezygotic reproductive isolation in sympatry than in allopatry has been seen time and again in a wide variety of taxa, ranging from insects to fish and frogs (Table 1).
To better understand the geographic structure of the zone of sympatry in the San Mateo Mountains, we identified trees as Q.
Morphological differences are thus more likely to be under selection by ecological conditions experienced in sympatry (Smith 1990; Skulason and Smith 1995).
During periods of overlapping flowering times in regions of sympatry, any pollen flow from C.
Since they belong to the same exerge, and have the same habitat preferences, interbreeding rather than sympatry would be a likely outcome were their ranges to contact one another.
The present ranges of the six taxa identified to species were used in determining this area of sympatry.
This model provides a novel mechanism for the emergence of assortative mating in sympatry, but does not allow for the coexistence of the sibling species.
As before, we consider that the appropriate criterion for species status is the ability of two taxa to remain distinct in sympatry.
Species often express some differences in habitat choice which enable their co-occurrence in sympatry and this phenomenon is particularly noticeable for related taxa and during range shifts.
Interspecific exchange of avian influenza virus genes in Alaska: the influence of trans-hemispheric migratory tendency and breeding ground sympatry.