sympathy


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sympathy

 [sim´pah-the]
1. a sense of sharing another's feelings, especially in sorrow or trouble, through some mechanism of transference or an imaginative identification with the other's situation; it is a precursor to compassion.
2. an influence produced in any organ by disease, disorder, or other change in another part.
3. a relation that exists between people or things such that change in the state of one is reflected in the other.

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē), Do not confuse this word with empathy.
1. The mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body.
2. Mental contagion, as seen in mass hysteria or in the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn.
3. An expressed sensitive appreciation or emotional concern for and sharing of the mental and emotional state of another person. Compare: empathy (1).
[G. sympatheia, fr. sym- + pathos, suffering]

sympathy

/sym·pa·thy/ (sim´pah-the)
1. compassion for another person's thoughts, feelings, and experiences.
2. an influence produced in any organ by disease, disorder, or other change in another part.
3. a relation which exists between people or things such that change in the state of one is reflected in the other.

sympathy

(sĭm′pə-thē)
n. pl. sympa·thies
1.
a. A feeling of pity or sorrow for the distress of another; commiseration.
b. often sympathies An expression of such feeling: offered her sympathies to the mourning family.
2.
a. A relationship or affinity between things in which whatever affects one correspondingly affects the other: "Continuous measurements of ionospheric densities ... showed a variation of noon ionization in sympathy with sunspot activity" (E.V. Appelton).
b. Physics A relation between bodies such that vibrations in one body cause sympathetic vibrations in another.
c. Physiology A relation between parts or organs by which a disease or disorder in one induces an effect in the other.

sympathy

[sim′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, sympathein
1 an expressed interest or concern regarding the problems, emotions, or states of mind of another. Compare empathy.
2 the relation that exists between the mind and body, causing the one to be affected by the other.
3 mental contagion or the influence exerted by one individual or group on another and the effects produced, such as the spread of panic, uncontrollable laughter, or yawning.
4 the physiological or pathological relationship between two organs, systems, or parts of the body. sympathetic, adj., sympathize, v.

sympathy

Psychiatry A feeling or capacity for sharing in the interests or concerns of another, often without emotional attachment to the sympathy's recipient. Cf Empathy.

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē)
1. The mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body.
2. Mental contagion, as seen in mass hysteria or in the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn.
3. An expressed sensitive appreciation or emotional concern for and sharing of the mental and emotional state of another person.
Compare: empathy (1)

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē) Do not confuse this word with empathy.
Mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of body.

sympathy,

n the kind understanding of a patient.

sympathy

an influence produced in any organ by disease or disorder in another part. See also sympathetic ophthalmia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key Words: User-Generated, Organization, Information, Sympathy, Organizational Reputation, Secondary Crisis Communication, Crisis Communication, Public Relations
In his first chapter, Lobis closely examines the treatment of sympathy in Kenelm Digby's A Late Discourse Touching the Cure of Wounds by the Powder of Sympathy (1658), which Lobis deems "the most noted and extensive attempt to account for sympathy in mechanistic terms in the seventeenth century" (33).
Deepest sympathy to Pat, Abigail, Gregory and Frankie and families.
The Romantic Crowd opens with a survey of sympathy according to the Scottish Enlightenment.
From Clarissa Dalloway's intuitive sympathy for the distant figure of Septimus Smith to the interlocking subjectivities of The Waves, Woolf shows the affective workings of such abstract human connections.
The crowds that generated discussion of sympathy gathered to argue for political rights relating to a number of important issues during the hundred years covered by this book.
HRH the Prime Minister also dispatched two cables of condolences and sympathy to his brother the Kuwaiti Crown Prince His Highness Sheikh Nawaf Al-Ahmed Al-Jabir Al-Sabah and also to his brother Sheikh Jabir Al-Mubarak Al-Hamad Al-Sabah the Premier, sympathizing on the demise of the late Sheikha Jawahir Fahd Al-Malik Al-Sabah.
WOODIER Maureen With deepest sympathy to all the family.
I cannot understand any wave, however small, of public sympathy for this man.
As expressions of caring and compassion, empathy and sympathy are sometimes confused by mental health counselors and may mistakenly be equated (Chismar, 1988).
Mary of The Rosary Catholic Church for all the kindness and sympathy shown to them during their recent sad loss, for the floral tributes and the many mass and sympathy cards received.
Nonetheless, both Carpenter and Mielke seek to recuperate sentimentalism's potential for antiracist activism--Carpenter by emphasizing anger, Mielke sympathy.