sympathy


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sympathy

 [sim´pah-the]
1. a sense of sharing another's feelings, especially in sorrow or trouble, through some mechanism of transference or an imaginative identification with the other's situation; it is a precursor to compassion.
2. an influence produced in any organ by disease, disorder, or other change in another part.
3. a relation that exists between people or things such that change in the state of one is reflected in the other.

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē), Do not confuse this word with empathy.
1. The mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body.
2. Mental contagion, as seen in mass hysteria or in the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn.
3. An expressed sensitive appreciation or emotional concern for and sharing of the mental and emotional state of another person. Compare: empathy (1).
[G. sympatheia, fr. sym- + pathos, suffering]

sympathy

/sym·pa·thy/ (sim´pah-the)
1. compassion for another person's thoughts, feelings, and experiences.
2. an influence produced in any organ by disease, disorder, or other change in another part.
3. a relation which exists between people or things such that change in the state of one is reflected in the other.

sympathy

(sĭm′pə-thē)
n. pl. sympa·thies
1.
a. A feeling of pity or sorrow for the distress of another; commiseration.
b. often sympathies An expression of such feeling: offered her sympathies to the mourning family.
2.
a. A relationship or affinity between things in which whatever affects one correspondingly affects the other: "Continuous measurements of ionospheric densities ... showed a variation of noon ionization in sympathy with sunspot activity" (E.V. Appelton).
b. Physics A relation between bodies such that vibrations in one body cause sympathetic vibrations in another.
c. Physiology A relation between parts or organs by which a disease or disorder in one induces an effect in the other.

sympathy

[sim′pəthē]
Etymology: Gk, sympathein
1 an expressed interest or concern regarding the problems, emotions, or states of mind of another. Compare empathy.
2 the relation that exists between the mind and body, causing the one to be affected by the other.
3 mental contagion or the influence exerted by one individual or group on another and the effects produced, such as the spread of panic, uncontrollable laughter, or yawning.
4 the physiological or pathological relationship between two organs, systems, or parts of the body. sympathetic, adj., sympathize, v.

sympathy

Psychiatry A feeling or capacity for sharing in the interests or concerns of another, often without emotional attachment to the sympathy's recipient. Cf Empathy.

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē)
1. The mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body.
2. Mental contagion, as seen in mass hysteria or in the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn.
3. An expressed sensitive appreciation or emotional concern for and sharing of the mental and emotional state of another person.
Compare: empathy (1)

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē) Do not confuse this word with empathy.
Mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of body.

sympathy,

n the kind understanding of a patient.

sympathy

an influence produced in any organ by disease or disorder in another part. See also sympathetic ophthalmia.
References in classic literature ?
But her sympathy does not blind her to the world of comedy; figures like Mrs.
I was easily led by the sympathy which he evinced to use the language of my heart, to give utterance to the burning ardour of my soul and to say, with all the fervour that warmed me, how gladly I would sacrifice my fortune, my existence, my every hope, to the furtherance of my enterprise.
I spoke of my desire of finding a friend, of my thirst for a more intimate sympathy with a fellow mind than had ever fallen to my lot, and expressed my conviction that a man could boast of little happiness who did not enjoy this blessing.
I thank you," he replied, "for your sympathy, but it is useless; my fate is nearly fulfilled.
This manuscript will doubtless afford you the greatest pleasure; but to me, who know him, and who hear it from his own lips--with what interest and sympathy shall I read it in some future day
Deepest sympathy to Joanne, Anthony, Toni and Family.
Manama: June 17 -- (BNA)-- His Majesty King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa dispatched a cable of condolences and sympathy to his brother His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmed Al-Jabir Al-Sabah the Amir of the sisterly State of Kuwait on the demise of the late Sheikha Jawahir Fahd Al-Malik Al-Sabah.
On behalf of HH the Emir Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, HE Sheikh Jon bin Hamad al-Thani has conveyed condolences and sympathy to Prince Salman bin Abdulaziz al-Saud, Crown Prince, Deputy Prime Minister and Defence Minister of Saudi Arabia, on the death of Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz al-Saud.
The Italian fears he will have little sympathy for the punishing schedule his team face over the next two months because he has such an expensive squad.
WOODIER Maureen Heartfelt sympathy to the Woodier Family.
THERE should be no public sympathy for gunman Raoul Moat, Prime Minister David Cameron said, describing him as a "callous murderer".
At various times in the treatment process, mental health counselors may inadvertently equate the concepts of empathy and sympathy This confusion is" understandable because there is ambiguity between the two terms that could contribute to miscommunication in counseling.