sympathy

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sympathy

 [sim´pah-the]
1. a sense of sharing another's feelings, especially in sorrow or trouble, through some mechanism of transference or an imaginative identification with the other's situation; it is a precursor to compassion.
2. an influence produced in any organ by disease, disorder, or other change in another part.
3. a relation that exists between people or things such that change in the state of one is reflected in the other.

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē), Do not confuse this word with empathy.
1. The mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body.
2. Mental contagion, as seen in mass hysteria or in the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn.
3. An expressed sensitive appreciation or emotional concern for and sharing of the mental and emotional state of another person. Compare: empathy (1).
[G. sympatheia, fr. sym- + pathos, suffering]

sympathy

(sĭm′pə-thē)
n. pl. sympa·thies
1.
a. A feeling of pity or sorrow for the distress of another; commiseration.
b. often sympathies An expression of such feeling: offered her sympathies to the mourning family.
2.
a. A relationship or affinity between things in which whatever affects one correspondingly affects the other: "Continuous measurements of ionospheric densities ... showed a variation of noon ionization in sympathy with sunspot activity" (E.V. Appelton).
b. Physics A relation between bodies such that vibrations in one body cause sympathetic vibrations in another.
c. Physiology A relation between parts or organs by which a disease or disorder in one induces an effect in the other.

sympathy

Psychiatry A feeling or capacity for sharing in the interests or concerns of another, often without emotional attachment to the sympathy's recipient. Cf Empathy.

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē)
1. The mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body.
2. Mental contagion, as seen in mass hysteria or in the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn.
3. An expressed sensitive appreciation or emotional concern for and sharing of the mental and emotional state of another person.
Compare: empathy (1)

sym·pa·thy

(sim'pă-thē) Do not confuse this word with empathy.
Mutual relation, physiologic or pathologic, between two organs, systems, or parts of body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly eight-in-ten Republicans (79 per cent) sympathise more with Israel than the Palestinians, while just 6 per cent sympathise more with the Palestinians; another 7 per cent say they sympathise with both or neither, while 9 per cent say they do not know.
We must clearly sympathise with those MPs representing the Labour Party who are prepared to put self interest first and foremost, and who are prepared to sacrifice both their party and the needs of the country who demand a credible Opposition Labour Party, and who have demonstrated their willingness to be party to deceit and an attempted Regime Change.
I also sympathise with those readers who, accept the inevitable, that the Liberals will never become a majority power on the back of them striving to do so, shirk their responsibilities, and the most that they can expect is to become involved in a deceitful Coalition.
He has said that he sympathises with shamed MPs and has asked for an end to the "systematic humiliation" of mainstream politicians which he fears will play into the hands of the lunatic fringe like the BNP.
However I sympathise much more readily with the parents of children who will die earlier than they would otherwise, suffering from a range of avoidable illnesses related to bad diet and obesity in particular.
I also sympathise with the passengers trying to catch the 14.23 London train from Bangor on Monday on March 31, because it left eight minutes early!
I wanted to say how much we sympathise with everybody who has been affected by floods."
I can sympathise that having failed in his attempt, he is very upset.
[bar] SIR - I sympathise with the Croesyceiliog student forced to complete the Welsh Bac ("Welsh Bac 'worth less than A-level A-grade'", May 14).
FANS have been advised to sympathise with the Germans - to stay healthy.
The group also sympathise with wife of the president, Mrs Aisha Buhari, over the incident, praying God to strengthen her and as well grant Yusuf quick recovery.
Gatland said the communities of Christchurch andWales were comparable and that people inWales would sympathise with the tragedy.