symbolism

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Related to symbolist: Symbolist Movement

symbolism

 [sim´bah-lizm]
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object, which is often of a sexual nature, so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm),
1. In psychoanalysis, the process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which a person regards everything that happens as symbolic of that person's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.

symbolism

/sym·bol·ism/ (sim´bo-lizm)
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

symbolism

[sim′bəlizəm]
1 the representation or evocation of one idea, action, or object by the use of another, as in systems of writing, poetic language, or dream metaphor.
2 (in psychiatry) an unconscious mental mechanism characteristic of all human thinking in which a mental image stands for but disguises some other object, person, or thought, especially one associated with emotional conflict. The mechanism is a principal factor in the formation of dreams and in various symptoms resulting from such anxious and psychotic conditions as conversion reactions, obsessions, and compulsions. Also called symbolization.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm)
1. psychoanalysis The process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which one regards everything that happens as symbolic of one's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the core of the symbolist enterprise is the assumption of "correspondences," a concept taken from the title of a poem by Charles Baudelaire.
The book's arguments become problematic with the consideration of Scott's involvement with theosophy and the author's suggestions about Scott's incorporation of theosophy into his symbolist aesthetic stance.
In 1888, Emile Bernard and Paul Gauguin were the first Symbolist artists to exploit the Baudelairian connections of color and sound through the development of Cloisonism, a style of painting that divided the canvas into color-rich regions.
In 1913, he published a complex tale under the deceptively simple title "A mayse" (A Story) which, in its blend of folklore, symbolic figures, and enigmatic dialogue, marked the beginning of his mature symbolist work.
Furthermore, by describing her eroticism as mystical and otherworldly as opposed to human and carnal, Ribeiro helped forever seal her fate to be regarded exclusively as a symbolist.
Voegelin appears to have read all the great French writers of the symbolist movement, seeking in literature a place where the life of the spirit continued to flourish when ideology and positivistic social science drove it out of other cultural fields.
By these minimal means she could suggest the immolation of Wagner's Briinnhilde; for this we have the witness of the Symbolist poet Georges Rodenbach, who was an aficionado of her art.
KINGDOM of the Soul, Symbolist Art in Germany (1870-1920), is on show at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery until July 30.
Pavel Florensky's work The Pillar and Ground of the Truth [Stolp i utverzhdenie istini] was first published in 1914, at the height of the Symbolist movement in Russia.
Drawing on a solid theoretical framework mainly informed by psychoanalysis and gender theory, his analysis appeals to "the sophisticated ears of postmodern readers" (13) because of the intricate web it discloses, a literary web which establishes connections between the Gothic and the Symbolist tradition and in which the peculiar anxiety of influence evidenced in the writings of the scapigliati comes to the fore.
Symons incorporated his critical responses to Huysmans' En Route and La Cathedrale into a chapter in The Symbolist Movement in Literature, which he tided "Huysmans the Symbolist.
That criticism and the Symbolist tradition of High Modernism it favored was unsympathetic to poets like Creeley, Blackburn, or Bromige, who had cut their teeth on Williams, Stein, and Oppen during the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, before university presses or New Directions collected these poets' works and tailor-edited them for the academic market.