symbolism

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symbolism

 [sim´bah-lizm]
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object, which is often of a sexual nature, so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm),
1. In psychoanalysis, the process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which a person regards everything that happens as symbolic of that person's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.

symbolism

/sym·bol·ism/ (sim´bo-lizm)
1. the act or process of representing something by a symbol.
2. in psychoanalytic theory, a mechanism of unconscious thinking characterized by substitution of a symbol for a repressed or threatening impulse or object so as to avoid censorship by the superego.

symbolism

[sim′bəlizəm]
1 the representation or evocation of one idea, action, or object by the use of another, as in systems of writing, poetic language, or dream metaphor.
2 (in psychiatry) an unconscious mental mechanism characteristic of all human thinking in which a mental image stands for but disguises some other object, person, or thought, especially one associated with emotional conflict. The mechanism is a principal factor in the formation of dreams and in various symptoms resulting from such anxious and psychotic conditions as conversion reactions, obsessions, and compulsions. Also called symbolization.

sym·bol·ism

(sim'bŏl-izm)
1. psychoanalysis The process involved in the disguised representation in consciousness of unconscious or repressed contents or events.
2. A mental state in which one regards everything that happens as symbolic of one's own thoughts.
3. The description of the emotional life and experiences in abstract terms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although critics have often situated these symbolist novels within the decadent movement, the author suggests that the key difference between the two lies in the gravity of symbolism versus decadent dilettantism.
In the Symbolist context, "syncretism" is best understood with reference to Gustave Moreau, one of the pioneers of Symbolist painting in France, whose visionary use of myth had a profound influence on numerous poets and artists of the period.
Nevertheless, by tapping into occult and Symbolist currents, Blavatsky, along with her theosophist lieutenants Annie Besant and C.
There, between 1922 and 1923, Nister published most of his symbolist work.
the Symbolist views on the power of language and the synthesis of the
Voegelin appears to have read all the great French writers of the symbolist movement, seeking in literature a place where the life of the spirit continued to flourish when ideology and positivistic social science drove it out of other cultural fields.
By these minimal means she could suggest the immolation of Wagner's Briinnhilde; for this we have the witness of the Symbolist poet Georges Rodenbach, who was an aficionado of her art.
She argues that this play is "avant-garde Symbolist in theme" because of "the emphasis on `style' in the work of art, the idea of correspondence between form (appearance) and content (reality), [and] Aestheticism as the critical force to break through the inert status-quo" (92).
KINGDOM of the Soul, Symbolist Art in Germany (1870-1920), is on show at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery until July 30.
For example, the opening image of his poem 'Der Turm' is traced back to the novel Le Carilloneur by the Belgian Symbolist Georges Rodenbach, while 'Die Flamingos' is said to recall Baudelaire's poem 'Lesbos'.
Pavel Florensky's work The Pillar and Ground of the Truth [Stolp i utverzhdenie istini] was first published in 1914, at the height of the Symbolist movement in Russia.
The internal chapters of Wagner in Russia devoted to "Wagner and the Symbolists" prove to be the most provocative and, for those new to the topic, the most surprising, as Bartlett introduces the principal Russian Symbolist writers, all of whom were receptive to German culture.