symbolic representation


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symbolic representation

in psychoanalysis, the substitution by the unconscious of a simple concrete image or symbol for a highly emotionally charged idea or object.
References in periodicals archive ?
Smith,"Early symbolic representation, in Development of mental representation: Theories and Applications," Mahwah, NJ: Earlbaum, 1999.
These materials encourage students to recall their earlier enacted activities and provide a scaffold between these activities and the symbolic representations of relationships to come.
In their study of the mutually reinforcing relationship between representative symbolism, gender and political power, The Symbolic Representation of Gender: A Discursive Approach, Emanuela Lombardo and Petra Meier (2014) interrogate the meaning and function of the symbolic representation of gender and its relationship for the reproduction of political authority and power.
The narrative can either be read as a literal exploration of a quest for survival or a symbolic representation of a journey through life in the search for some sort of salvation.
This is really the first culturally symbolic representation we have here," said Kali Storm, the director of the school's Aboriginal Student Centre.
According to Rolon Collazo, Buero Vallejo's Fernandita falls into the category of archetypical and symbolic representation of the masses while in Molina's film she experiences (along with two other female characters) some (small) degree of feminist consciousness raising.
For both Bazin and Andrew, when a filmmaker focuses on symbolic representation over realism, the film travels outside the bounds of the cinema.
Lipson and is a symbolic representation of the doctor's life.
Symbolic representation brought about an axial change in consciousness" (24).
acknowledged that their absence leaves the project "glaringly wanting in terms of symbolic representation within the U.
You see my entire family is rather religious and do not let go of their tendency to see people as people first and a symbolic representation of their religious beliefs later.
Evans holds that intentionality and the ability to recognize communicative intentions are necessary prerequisites for the evolution of symbolic representation in language (an important prerequisite of a code is to be able to encode and externalize humanly-relevant concepts and combinations of concepts).