model

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model

 [mod´'l]
1. something that represents or simulates something else; a replica.
2. a reasonable facsimile of the body or any of its parts; used for demonstration and teaching purposes.
3. to initiate another's behavior; see modeling.
4. a hypothesis or theory.
5. in nursing theory, an abstract conceptual framework used to organize knowledge and serve as a guide for observation and interpretation; see also conceptual model.
articulation m's a process of educational mobility in which programs work together to enable students to progress between levels of nursing education programs with the fewest possible barriers and repetitions of content.
conceptual model see conceptual model.
PLISSIT model a progressive design of sexual counseling that contains the four steps of permission, limited information, specific suggestions, and intensive therapy.

mod·el

(mod'ĕl),
1. A representation of something, often idealized or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand.
2. Something to be imitated.
3. In dentistry, a cast.
4. A mathematic representation of a particular phenomenon.
5. An animal that is used to mimic a pathologic condition.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

model

(mŏd′l)
n.
1. A small object, usually built to scale, that represents in detail another, often larger object.
2. A schematic description or representation of something, especially a system or phenomenon, that accounts for its properties and is used to study its characteristics: a model of generative grammar; a model of an atom; an economic model.
adj.
Being, serving as, or used as a model.
v. mod·eled, mod·eling, mod·els also mod·elled or mod·elling
v.tr.
1. To make or construct a descriptive or representational model of: computer programs that model climate change.
2. Psychology
a. To exhibit (a behavior) in such a way as to promote the establishment of similar patterns of behavior in another: The therapist modeled socially appropriate conversation.
b. To repeat (a behavior observed in another): The child was modeling her mother's nurturing behavior.
v.intr.
To make a model.

mod′el·er n.

model

EBM
A formal framework for representing and analysing a process (e.g.,  a clinical trial) or data relevant to a process.

model

A conceptual representation of a thing or concept. See Acucare model, Age-structured model, Animal model, Biopsychosocial model, Brownian rachet model, Civil defense model, Coalescence model, Compartment model, Component object model, Conceptual model, Conflagration model, Coronary Heart Disease Policy model, Danger model, David Eddy cervical cancer model, Demand model, Deterministic model, Discrete time model, Disney model, Effector inhibition model, Emergency Medical Services model, Event model, Extrapolation model, Five factor model, Fixed effects model, Failure rate model, Frailty model, Framework model, Group model, Hebbian model, HMO model, Hobson model, Homo economicus model, Independent Practice Association model, K Mart model, Kirk model, Linear model, Mathematical model, Mouse model, MPM–mortalities probability model, Needs model, Open access model, Partnership model, Point-of-service model, Prediction model, Prevalence model, Process model, Pyramid model, Radial unit model, Remodeling model, Risk adjustment model, RITARD model, Scissors grip model, SEIR model, Self-nonself model, Sinclair swine model, Sliding filament model, Staff model, Supply model, Three-tiered model, Two-tiered model.

mod·el

(mod'ěl)
1. A representation of something, often idealized or modified to make it conceptually easier to understand.
2. Something to be imitated.
3. dentistry A cast.
4. A mathematical representation of a particular phenomenon.
5. An animal that is used to mimic a pathologic condition.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

mod·el

(mod'ěl)
1. In dentistry, a cast.
2. A representation of something.
[It. midello, fr. L. modus, measure, standard]

Patient discussion about model

Q. how can models function without eating? whenever I skip lunch I find that I am not feeling well by the afternoon, and according to a magazine I read they basically live on ice(!), diet coke, champaign and cigarettes…

A. Champaign (as all alcoholic drinks) actually contains a significant amount of calories... :-) No one can function with out eating AT ALL, but they do get more used to eating LESS, and their body adjust itself (i.e. uses the food more efficiently) - it's harmful and may damage them in the short and long term, but it's possible.

More discussions about model
References in periodicals archive ?
NuSMV [26] is a symbolic model checker that appeared as an extension of the Binary Decision Diagrams(BDD)-based model checker SMV.
The symbolic model checker computes the upper bound using the multipolyhedra widening technique with a widening seed s = 2, and it converges after 3 iterations.
Our example shows that the specification of a cache protocol model in the symbolic model checking method is fairly complex, even though we have excluded the data paths.
In this paper, we present a new technique to reduce LTL specifications' complexity towards symbolic model checking, namely, CePRe.
Currently, we are refining our symbolic model checker for SREL based on SMV.
(1) The comparison of BDD-based symbolic model checking and bounded model checking.
This article presents a formal visual language for representing symbolic models as semantic networks that are both comprehensible by people and that compile to a computational form supporting automatic inference.
Some other types of symbolic model, such as decision trees, share with connectionist models this property of being highly constrained.
Srikanth, 1992, "Integrating Mathematical and Symbolic Models Through Aesop--An Expert for Stock-Options Pricing", Information Systems Research, 3:359-378
Electronic media and computer technology have accelerated the process of acculturation by broadening the range of symbolic models available to a society, allowing observers to transcend the bounds of t heir immediate environment and adopt the ideas and behaviors of exemplars from distant locales (often to the chagrin of totalitarian governments).
Both aspired to "resynthesize the symbolic models and organizational mechanisms of collective identity" in the face of tension and crisis and through them the boundaries of the collectivity were relaxed, the barriers which segregated the elect from the unregenerate were dismantled and thus the world was brought into the church.
For example, probabilistic reasoning and symbolic reasoning should be brought together to provide rapid solutions to the likely cases, and explainable alternatives derived from symbolic models for the rarer cases.

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