symblepharon


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symblepharon

 [sim-blef´ah-ron]
adhesion of an eyelid(s) to the eyeball.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·bleph·a·ron

(sim-blef'ă-ron),
Adhesion of one or both eyelids to the eyeball, partial or complete, resulting from burns or other trauma but rarely congenital.
Synonym(s): atretoblepharia
[sym- + G. blepharon, eyelid]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sym·bleph·a·ron

(sim-blef'ă-ron)
Adhesion of one or both eyelids to the eyeball, partial or complete, resulting from burns, trauma, or cicatricial pemphigoid.
See also: blepharosynechia
[sym- + G. blepharon, eyelid]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

symblepharon

Adhesion of the layer of CONJUNCTIVA lining the eyelids to the layer lining the eyeball. This results from loss of the ‘non-stick’ epithelial surface layers.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

symblepharon 

Adhesion, partial or complete, of the palpebral conjunctiva of the eyelid to the bulbar conjunctiva of the eyeball. It results from disease (e.g. erythema multiforme) or trauma, but is rarely congenital. See Stevens-Johnson syndrome.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
In the autograft group, there were three conjunctivitis, one symblepharon, and one granuloma.
Patients having associated problems like dry eyes, symblepharon, conjunctivitis and keratitis were also not included in the study group.
* Conjunctiva was examined for hyperemia, lymphoid follicle, papillae, cicatrization, and symblepharon.
recently reported corneal deformities with accompanying bilateral ectropion and symblepharon in a 57-year-old patient with KS.
They discuss conjunctival symblepharon therapy; the management of uveitic glaucoma; corneal procedures; cataract extraction and intraocular lens placement; various types of biopsies; therapeutic vitreoretinal surgery for non-infectious intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis; epiretinal membrane removal; fluocinolone acetonide sustained drug delivery; dexamethasone biodegradable intravitreal implants; and biopsy analysis.
The unpredictable rates and timings of the recurrence are the main problems encountered after various treatment modalities.7 A recurrent pterygium causes decreased visual acuity, ocular motility restriction and symblepharon formation.6,7 Mitomycin-c and Conjunctivalautograft are two useful adjuncts in reducing the pterygium recurrence.
Ocular involvement, including chemosis, blepharoconjunctivitis, keratitis, symblepharon, ankyloblepharon, cicatricial ectropion, and mydriasis, was reported in 89% of the affected birds.
Physical examination at the eye hospital demonstrated a painful left eye with 3+ chemosis in the eyelids and conjunctiva and symblepharon at the lower pole of the eye.
Nonpruritic, palpable purpura on the right leg of this 45-year-old Middle Eastern man was accompanied by con-junctival inflammation with a proliferative response in the left eye, symblepharon in the right eye, progressive nasal airway destruction, extensive inflammation in the upper airway, and an intermittent, slightly productive cough.
Reddish and flaccid vesicles, xerosis, symblepharon, and conjunctival scars can appear.
(6,7) later reported using AM transplantation (AMT) for the surgical treatment of pterygia, corneal defects, symblepharon, and neoplasia.
The main ocular sign of this autoimmune disease is a cicatricial symblepharon due to a subepithelial, complement-mediated inflammation caused by autoantibodies (IgG or IgA) directed to some antigen in the basement membrane [9].