symbiosis

(redirected from symbiotically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

/sym·bi·o·sis/ (sim″bi-o´sis) pl. symbio´ses   [Gr.]
1. in parasitology, the close association of two dissimilar organisms, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between mother and infant.

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life
1 a mode of living characterized by a close association between organisms of different species.
2 a state in which two people are emotionally dependent on each other.
3 a pathologic inability of a child to separate from its mother emotionally and sometimes physically. symbiotic, adj.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

symbiosis

close association, e.g. commensalism between two species, of benefit to both

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

the biological association of two individuals or populations of different species, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
They've all gelled solid, symbiotically leaning on each other like whales and barnacles.
The brewpub has also grown symbiotically with the growth and revitalization of downtown.
An endophyte that is already known to coexist symbiotically with another living organism such as a benign fungus hosted by a healthy tree--has demonstrated that it is compatible with higher forms of life.
As these compounds can vary in bioactivity and biospecificity it may be possible to utilise a range of the compounds to symbiotically stimulate the immune system leading to a more efficacious response (Smith 2002).
Merian went with a plan in mind: to conduct a study of the insects of the region, eventually published in 1705 under the title Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium, full of her meticulous engravings of butterflies and moths, beetles and bees, and of the specific plants with which they symbiotically live.
If we accept this version of history, then there is no golden age when the university stood above mass culture-they rose together, and symbiotically, to the point that Michael Denning calls the neoliberal university "a form of global mass culture" ("Lineaments").
Tekiner's essay explains how the formalist art criticism associated with Clement Greenberg" functioned symbiotically with art marketers" to "uphold conservative agendas" and to mask the progressive content intended by "many modern artists [who] construed their transcendental subjects as signifiers of freedom, and their art works as expressions of liberated imagination" during the stultifying conformism of postwar North America.
He portrays the land of the South as symbiotically linked with the plight of African Americans, since after all both suffer from a form of parasitism on the part of whites.
In these circumstances, I would far rather have the crutch of titles to help me appreciate the music-dramatic synthesis of Wagner's operas, or of any works in which text and music are symbiotically linked.
With this author's skill, discipline, and reflective capacities, "War Movies" illustrates how memory and art each in their own way and also symbiotically make the past and play into its vitality when one does not shrink from it.
He draws a fascinating portrait of the hobo counterculture that developed symbiotically with the rise of this migratory mass.