symbiosis

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symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

/sym·bi·o·sis/ (sim″bi-o´sis) pl. symbio´ses   [Gr.]
1. in parasitology, the close association of two dissimilar organisms, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between mother and infant.

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life

symbiosis

[sim′bē·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, syn, together, bios, life
1 a mode of living characterized by a close association between organisms of different species.
2 a state in which two people are emotionally dependent on each other.
3 a pathologic inability of a child to separate from its mother emotionally and sometimes physically. symbiotic, adj.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

symbiosis

close association, e.g. commensalism between two species, of benefit to both

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

the biological association of two individuals or populations of different species, classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
References in periodicals archive ?
A specialty of The Roof restaurant, the dish was cooked to perfection with the peanut sauce blended symbiotically well with the well-done chicken.
However, while the region strives to become the smartest in the world, the findings of Accenture's Technology Vision 2017 are clear: technology must not replace humans, instead both must work together symbiotically to complement each other's aptitudes.
By working symbiotically with the plants root system delivering the nutrients it was fed in production along with the other microbes already existing in the soil.
BioFiltro combines physical filtration with biological by inoculating the woodshavings media with an industry specific mix of microbes, bacteria, and worms which work symbiotically together to form a digestive biofilm across all system medias.
The author has a way of making the projects herein sound fairly straightforward; for example, aquaculture, the practice of raising fish and vegetables symbiotically, seems simple when described as a system where fish waste and water irrigate and fertilize plants.
Rents across Sharjah's more affordable areas remain symbiotically linked to the performance of Dubai's rental market," the report states.
They have also worked with clients on integrating hydroponics, building systems where fish and plants are grown symbiotically.
Healthcare facilities require us to continue to take a holistic approach to their design, not only by involving a multidisciplinary team In the design process, but also by looking at the culture of the organization and how that culture can be harnessed to work symbiotically with the facility design.
So cover crops and green manures are interchangeable terms, perhaps even working symbiotically towards the same end result to improve and protect the soil while allowing crop growth and additional nutritional value.
2) Major evolutionary transitions: Sometimes, when group selection within an entity evolves to where internal dissension is minimal, it can join symbiotically with other groups to form a new entity that then competes at a higher level of organization.
Then, in the next, he becomes a moving piece of furniture as he symbiotically joins with his camera.
He does argue that "the respective objectives that emerge in their ethical writings turn out symbiotically to serve one another in ways not previously considered" (237).