symbiosis


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symbiosis

 [sim″bi-o´sis, sĭm″bē-ō´sĭs] (pl. symbio´ses)
1. in parasitology, the biologic association of two individuals or populations of different species; it is classified as mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, amensalism, or synnecrosis, depending on the advantage or disadvantage derived from the relationship.
2. in psychiatry, a mutually reinforcing relationship between persons who are dependent on each other; a normal characteristic of the relationship between a mother and infant. adj., adj symbiot´ic.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis),
1. The biologic association of two or more species. Compare: commensalism, mutualistic symbiosis, parasitism.
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant, or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.
[G. symbiōsis, state of living together, fr. sym- + bios, life, + -osis, condition]

symbiosis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. symbio·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. The biologic association of two or more species to their mutual benefit.
Compare: commensalism, parasitism
2. The mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people, such as mother and infant or husband and wife; sometimes used to denote excessive or pathologic interdependence of two people.

symbiosis

A close association, of interdependence or mutual benefit, between two or more organisms, often of different species.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sim'bē-ō'sis)
1. Biologic association of two or more species.
2. Mutual cooperation or interdependence of two people.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only strain 105 polyps had maintained the symbionts without co-culturing of strain J10 polyps after the eight-week co-culture, whereas we found that some other vulgaris group strains, that is, BW and SW collected in Lake Biwa and Fukuoka, Japan, respectively, maintained horizontally transmitted chlorococci without co-cultured strain J10 polyps and maintained the symbiosis for more than several months.
? Main, Symbiosis features Stephen Quildan, Liam Francis, Juan-Gil and Adam-Park.
In addition to confirming that symbiosis dates back to the Triassic, the study found that the corals inhabited nutrient-poor marine environments --not unlike today's subtropical waters--where algae-coral symbiosis played a major role in driving reef development.
The long-term benefit for a CMO like Symbiosis is we grow and scale-up as clients' products move through phases.
About 400 million years ago, the colonization of land by plants has been associated with the formation of mycorrhizal symbioses, symbiosis between plant roots and soil fungi [9,27,15].
Symbiosis happens on a microscopic scale, but also on a planetary scale.
The potent term 'industrial symbiosis' with its conscious parallel with symbiotic relationships in the natural eco-system has gained widespread recognition as the best practice delivering win-win solutions for business and the environment.
As part of the project, ramarketing has paired up with New York based scientific strategy and marketing agency, That's Nice LLC, to provide Symbiosis with full go-to-market support.
"Projects like this should undergo public consultation to maintain harmony between the government and the people," said Symbiosis president Edric Vargas, as he noted the lack of information dissemination across Bulan.
DataApex has released a control driver for Symbiosis Technology Components manufactured by Spark Holland BV.