syllepsis


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Related to syllepsis: synecdoche, syphilis

syllepsis

In medicine, an antiquated term of historic interest for pregnancy.
References in periodicals archive ?
--."Syllepsis Redux and the Rhetoric of Double Agency." Partial Answers 10/1 (2011): 93-120.
The possibility of syllepsis is raised when one tries to understand what it means to keep oneself intact in the face of every evil and in the face of every good.
Finally, it is the syllepsis that gathers the aporetic interpretants into a postmodernist dialogic construct in which rival meanings complement one another even when their sources--the original text and its intertext--suggest contradictory interpretations.
(8) For more on Riffaterrian intertextuality, see his Semiotics of Poetry, "Syllepsis," and "Intertextual Representation." See Allen for a general survey of different theories of intertextuality, including Riffaterre's.
Other theorists, most notably Michael Riffaterre, claim that intertextuality is meaningful only insofar as specific intertexts can be found and juxtaposed with the text under consideration (see Riffaterre, "Syllepsis" 620 and "Compulsory" 76).
syllepsisplural syllepses Greek syllepsis, literally, taking together, inclusion, a derivative of syllambanein to take together, comprehend
This segmentation takes place at each and every point where the surfacing of intertextuality is made manifest either by syllepsis or by a gap, or again by an ungrammaticality.
literary parallels might be the repetition of the word 'Forlorn' across a stanza break near the end of 'Ode to a Nightingale,' or the syllepsis in certain lines of Pope .
On syllepsis, rhetorical magnification (or diminution), see Carolus Halm, Rhetores Latini Minores (Leipzig: B.
Which is why when Bob Hicok, employs, for example, a form of zeugma called syllepsis (let's see if I can define this: when a word in a sentence breaks the syntactical and semantic rules of order in relation to other words in or sections of the sentence, so the delivery of meaning is disrupted; yikes.
Hendiadys is perhaps best defined by what it is not, according to Wright; "Grandiloquent re-wording." "overstated symmetries and congruities," simple parallelism or complex parallelism (syllepsis, zeugma), and other standard patterns of coordination are not hendiadys.
These decisions are especially pertinent when a syllepsis, or "a word interpretable in two senses," is involved because it compels the translator to choose and, in so doing, develop an interpretive perspective vis-a-vis the translation (38).