switchgrass


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switchgrass

see panicumvirgatum.
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rg]) to bare soil (Krbs) by the WEPP rangeland equation was much less than that of observed switchgrass and smooth bromegrass; however, root mass of only 5 cm of topsoil was considered in this study (Fig.
With these findings in hand, the researchers calculated that using switchgrass pellets instead of petroleum fuel oil to generate one gigajoule of heat in residences would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 146 pounds of C[O.
Because it can be used both as forage and as a biofuel crop, switchgrass may be well suited to California, a state with a large livestock industry and higher ethanol consumption than any other.
First report of rust on switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) caused by Puccinia emaculata in Tennessee.
Although there was one documented report of an escape of switchgrass from cultivation in Orange County, California (Riefner and Boyd 2007), there are no known records of its escaping elsewhere or causing any ecological or economic damage, despite its long-time use as a forage and conservation species (Parrish and Fike 2005).
They, too, have found getting started with switchgrass to "be a challenge, to say the least," according to Jim.
I've heard switchgrass is recommended for increasing cover quickly.
Results in several crops, including switchgrass, have shown levels of salt tolerance not seen before.
You're going to see a lot of marginal land that's not suitable for row crop production, because it's hilly, or it's not very productive for corn or soybeans, things like that, but it can be very productive for grasses, like miscanthus, or switchgrass, and you can use that to make the cellulose ethanol.
This trial lays the groundwork for future trials of growing PHA in bioengineered, nonfood oilseed and biomass crops such as switchgrass and sugarcane.
Virginia Tech has developed technology being used by a local company to turn common switchgrass into ethanol.