swine

(redirected from swinish)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

swine

(swīn)
n. pl. swine
Any of various omnivorous, even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, having a stout body with thick skin, a short neck, and a movable snout, especially the domesticated pig.

swine

pertaining to or emanating from swine (pigs, hogs). See also porcine.

African swine fever
see african swine fever.
classical swine fever
see classical swine fever.
swine dysentery
a contagious disease of young pigs caused by Brachyspirahyodysenteriae, characterized by severe porridge-like diarrhea, sometimes dysentery, dehydration and heavy morbidity and mortality rates.
swine erysipelas
swine fever
see classical swine fever; African swine fever.
swine influenza
a highly contagious upper respiratory disease of pigs caused by swine influenza virus and a concurrent infection with Haemophilus influenzae. Clinical signs include fever, stiffness, recumbency, labored breathing, sneezing, paroxysmal cough and nasal and ocular discharge. Called also ferkelgrippe.
swine paramyxovirus
see paramyxovirus encephalomyelitis.
swine paratyphoid
swine plague
fibrinous pneumonia caused by Pasteurella multocida. May occur in outbreak form with a number of litters of young pigs being affected within a short time.
swine vesicular disease
is a highly infectious disease of pigs caused by an enterovirus related to human coxsackie B5 virus. It is clinically indistinguishable from foot-and-mouth disease in pigs. Vesicular lesions occur at the coronet, causing severe lameness, and in the mouth and on the snout.
vesicular exanthema of swine
see vesicular exanthema of swine.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Roth's narrative, such sentiment, along with the rapacity that Pegeen and Axler exercise upon this intoxicated woman, corresponds as well to Lady Macbeth's plan for murdering Duncan: "When in swinish sleep / Their drenched natures lie as in a death, / What cannot you and I perform upon / The unguarded Duncan?
When Duncan is asleep-- Whereto the rather shall his day's hard journey Soundly invite him--his two chamberlains Will I with wine and wassail so convince, That memory, the warder of the brain, Shall be a fume, and the receipt of reason A limbeck only: when in swinish sleep Their drenched natures lie as in a death, What cannot you and I perform upon Th'unguarded Duncan, what not put upon His spongy officers, who shall bear the guilt Of our great quell?
We will have many opportunities to read about his swinish treatment of his wife, and it will be written often that he was nearly as bad a parent as his own parents were, though in a different way.
Thomas Spence and Radical Print Culture in the 1790s," effectively places Spence and the sharp political satire of Pig's Meat; Lessons for the Swinish Multitude (a periodical produced between 1793 and 1795) within a recognizable context of counter-Tory Romantic discourse (201).
De Mille's The Little American, a clutch of songs and the images decorating the sheet-music covers, and advertisements for everything f c m corsets to the "Prophylactic Tooth Brush" to note how even German civilians were characterized as swinish, drunken, lecherous; German Kultur mocked; and attributes such as cleanliness extolled as peculiarly American virtues.
The playwright's sympathies are clearly not with the swinish Polo brothers.
In another he talks about their differences: "The fundamental and most vicious, swinish, murderous and unchangeable fact is that we totally misunderstand each other.
Following his seduction of Mamaine in the spring of 1944, he wrote her a half-apologetic letter: "I know that I behaved in a rather swinish way .
Certainly, such a bestial or perhaps even swinish approach to diet aptly applies to Fitzpatrick's first case study: Sir John Oldcastle, otherwise known as Falstaff.
One concern shared by almost all writers on the subject was what the moralist and politician William Prynne described in his Healthes: Sicknesse of 1628 as the 'odious, swinish and unthrifty and state-disturbing sin' of drinking healths: a culture of drinking in rounds--common to all social classes--that exacerbated public drunkenness.
Like Wedgwood, he was an important figure in what later came to be called the classical revival in the final quarter of the 18th century, selling his products to what William Morris would describe a century later as 'the swinish rich'.
The novel-length version of Wolfe's 1939 novella, The Party at Jack's, has Frederick Jack dream of meeting again a German school-pal now quite old: "And yet the head and face had also a profound and massive strength, a curious and tragic mixture of swinish gluttony and lonely and sorrowful thought" (19).