swine

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swine

(swīn)
n. pl. swine
Any of various omnivorous, even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, having a stout body with thick skin, a short neck, and a movable snout, especially the domesticated pig.
References in periodicals archive ?
Against an antidemocratic terror of the urban crowd, or what Edmund Burke called "the swinish multitude" in his attack on the French Revolution, Marshall Berman, in "'Mass Merger': Whitman and Baudelaire, the Modern Street, and Democratic Culture," compares Whitman and Baudelaire as poets who seek to make people feel at home in the city by turning modern cities like New York and Paris into sites of erotic exchange between strangers and sites for "the liberation of sexual fantasy" (151).
The swinish Tories who know the price of everything and the value of nothing, and their Lib Dem lapdogs - and the weak, stupid con men of New Labour like Tony Blair.
Now that we're plumbing the depths of my swinish behavior, let's see what other hunts you need to know about.
They clip us drunkards, and with swinish phrase Soil our addition, and indeed it takes From our achievements, though performed at height, The pith and marrow of our attribute.
Though Napoles has become the face of pork, the social media giving that face a literally swinish appearance, she is not the heart and soul of pork or the wanton profligacy pork has come to represent.
The book, categorically called "the most swinish novel ever written," was (to the author's satisfaction) immediately placed on the Roman Catholic Index of Prohibited Books.
the rhetoric of constitutionalism contributed to its own destruction or transcendence," especially as Burke defended the tradition from corruption by the "swinish multitude." (88-90) He praises those radicals, like Thomas Paine, who identified the class nature of the 'language' of politics: "a bad Constitution for at least ninety-nine parts of the nation out of a hundred."(92) Thompson notes the case of the London Corresponding Society's Joseph Gerrald, whose advocacy of Paine's proposal for a National Convention of Reformers brought him to trial in 1794, where he was convicted and sentenced to fourteen years transportation.
Thelwall, self-educated and workingclass, does not, the argument proceeds, turn his back on his social and political origins, and his audiences are not 'the swinish multitude' previously assumed (42).
They will talk a lot about social injustice and "swinish capitalism," but talk about the occupation and the settlers is banned.
But the fundamental and most vicious, swinish, murderous and unchangeable fact is that we totally misunderstand each other."
Paul's as "papier-mache" But swinish urges temper angelic architectural appreciation, as he recounts escorting typists down the hill from the ethereal Lincoln Cathedral to the cinema.
In Roth's narrative, such sentiment, along with the rapacity that Pegeen and Axler exercise upon this intoxicated woman, corresponds as well to Lady Macbeth's plan for murdering Duncan: "When in swinish sleep / Their drenched natures lie as in a death, / What cannot you and I perform upon / The unguarded Duncan?