swine

(redirected from swinish)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

swine

(swīn)
n. pl. swine
Any of various omnivorous, even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, having a stout body with thick skin, a short neck, and a movable snout, especially the domesticated pig.

swine

pertaining to or emanating from swine (pigs, hogs). See also porcine.

African swine fever
see african swine fever.
classical swine fever
see classical swine fever.
swine dysentery
a contagious disease of young pigs caused by Brachyspirahyodysenteriae, characterized by severe porridge-like diarrhea, sometimes dysentery, dehydration and heavy morbidity and mortality rates.
swine erysipelas
swine fever
see classical swine fever; African swine fever.
swine influenza
a highly contagious upper respiratory disease of pigs caused by swine influenza virus and a concurrent infection with Haemophilus influenzae. Clinical signs include fever, stiffness, recumbency, labored breathing, sneezing, paroxysmal cough and nasal and ocular discharge. Called also ferkelgrippe.
swine paramyxovirus
see paramyxovirus encephalomyelitis.
swine paratyphoid
swine plague
fibrinous pneumonia caused by Pasteurella multocida. May occur in outbreak form with a number of litters of young pigs being affected within a short time.
swine vesicular disease
is a highly infectious disease of pigs caused by an enterovirus related to human coxsackie B5 virus. It is clinically indistinguishable from foot-and-mouth disease in pigs. Vesicular lesions occur at the coronet, causing severe lameness, and in the mouth and on the snout.
vesicular exanthema of swine
see vesicular exanthema of swine.
References in periodicals archive ?
All our friends have offered us their places, but I have pretty swinish habits and that would get old for them real soon," he said.
SHOCK over the slaying of teenagers Charlene Ellis and Latisha Shakespear has sparked a tidal wave of rage against the swinish thugs who brought death to a Birmingham street.
Tippling ironists laughed and said he'd soon be rich as Rothschild From their swinish Saturdays.
Whoever sticks his swinish snout in our socialist garden will pull it out bloodied.
Then again, great artists seem to get away with swinish behavior (see: ``Pollock'') because .
And within those three vast (and short, and swinish, and basically unknowing) movements, we inherit.
The symbol of the transformation is the donning of the gas mask at Messines, showing that 'the god of war had fashioned men in his own image, swinish snout, cuttlefish eyepieces, bestial trunks, figures that groped and ambled like blinded bears', and in his actions in that battle, not unlike Starkie's at Armentieres, Guy becomes what the system needs him to be:
These reserve pigs seemed to serve as foundational standards, (15) so that, in ritual, cows have come to work off the resilient swinish template which reserve pigs symbolically provide.
Dickens appears to know his subject so intimately that points in common emerge, especially when he constructs a psychobiography for his swinish counterparts: "They are never attended upon, or fed, or driven, or caught, but are thrown upon their own resources in early life, and become preternaturally knowing in consequence" (134).
Smokelike snow dribbled from the spruces I bumped into, I crawled in a snowdrift in the swinish drill, footcloths hanging from my boots.
He was deposed by a swinish young proprietor a few months before his 40th anniversary in the chair.
Speakers will discuss the current state of earmark reform, the increasingly tenuous earmark moratorium, and what needs to be done to stop Congress from continuing its swinish waysOpermanently.