swim bladder


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air blad·der

a gas-filled sac that is present in most fish and functions as a hydrostatic organ; it is located beneath the vertebral column primarily in the anterior abdomen and is connected with the esophagus in some species (for example, goldfish). Oxygen is transferred from a rich venous sinus into the swim bladder to increase buoyancy.
Synonym(s): swim bladder

swim bladder

n.
A gas-filled structure in many fishes that functions to maintain buoyancy and, in some species, to aid in respiration or to produce sound. Also called air bladder, gas bladder.

swim bladder

see AIR BLADDER.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the third passaging the cells were seeded over the decellularized fish swim bladder matrix placed in separate wells of a 6-well cell culture plate.
Many deep-sea fish have a swim bladder to help them stabilize their bodies at the bottom of the ocean.
Initiation of shrinkage of the graft and congestion surrounding the graft was observed in oesophagoplasty with fresh swim bladder graft on this day.
2 When a fish descends in the ocean, it is because the increased pressure from the water surrounding the fish results in compression of the air inside the fish's swim bladder.
Buckman and Kristen Whalen crafted a homemade, kid-sized fish costume for an anatomy lesson, complete with white teeth, sparkly silver fins, and an inflated pink balloon for a swim bladder.
Concentrations of such high-speed tissue also occur in the rattlesnake's tail and the toadfish's swim bladder, which the fish uses to produce sound.
Gandalf had faced starvation because his swim bladder was damaged and he could not rise to the surface of his bowl to feed.
AHE probably has a disorder of his swim bladder that is affecting his balance.
Therefore, the ECM from fish swim bladder may be good substitutes for the repair of tissue defects.
The surviving specimen has a damaged swim bladder and may have to be destroyed.
We're obligated to carry a venting device on Gulf reef fish trips, to help enable groupers to return to depth in the event their swim bladder bursts, but this practice shouldn't be necessary in shallow water.
Unlike birds, fish, mammals and other animals, because sharks are negatively buoyant and lack a gas-filled swim bladder, they quietly sink into the depths when they die, never to be seen again.