sweet protein

sweet protein

A protein (e.g., monellin or thaumatin) that binds specifically to taste receptors, evoking a sensation of sweetness up to 100,000 times sweeter than sugar on a molar basis.

Breeding plants to increase their sweetness has traditionally been empirical and based on increasing the sugar content, an approach that is often difficult, given the complexity of carbohydrate metabolism and the limited genetic palette of the plants being bred; genetic engineering of sweet proteins offers an alternative strategy for improving the flavour of edible plant products.

sweet protein

A protein–eg, monellin or thaumatin, that binds specifically to taste receptors, and evokes a sensation of sweetness 100,000 times > sugar on a molar basis. See Monellin, Thaumatin; Cf Artificial sweeteners, Aspartame, Cyclamates, Sweet herb.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The sweet protein bar market is incredibly saturated, with the majority of products having similar taste profiles and misleading brand names," he added.
(53) Variants of the Sweet Protein Brazzein with Improved Characteristics, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, 1,1 (available at https://www.warf.org/documents/technology-summary/P02087US.pdf).
Brazzein, a New High-Potency Thermostable Sweet Protein from Pentadiplandra brazzeana B., 355 FEBS LETTER 106, 106 (1994).
Recent attention has focused on three nascent natural alternative sweeteners: tagatose, derived from dairy; mogroside V, extracted from monk fruit; and brazzein, a sweet protein which comes from the oubli plant.
The 38 papers here cover structural studies of the sweetener receptor (including the genetic architecture of sweet taste, the detection of sweet stimuli and in vitro models), modeling of the sweetener receptor (including crystal structures of the sweet protein MNEI, molecular models and computational procedures), sweet taste transduction (including psychophysical studies, bitter-sweet interactions and the role of the taste buds), quantifying the reposes of sweet-sensitive taste bud cells, including perception and the acceptance of sweeteners), modulation of sweet-sensitive taste bud cell signaling, and advances in synthetic and natural non-calorie sweeteners.
It is a naturally occurring sweet protein and an enzyme that was first isolated as a sugar alternative by researchers at the University of Wisconsin.
"The sugar [content] is not that high; we guess that the sweet protein plays the same role as sugar," says Ming.
Sucrose efflux mediated by SWEET proteins as a key step for phloem transport.
For example, sweet taste cells on the human tongue appear broadly tuned to recognize a number of compounds, including the sugars fructose, glucose and sucrose; several artificial sweeteners, such as saccharin (Sweet'N Low) and aspartame; and some amino acids and sweet proteins. But mice, for example, don't seem to respond to aspartame, the sweet of Equal and NutraSweet.
Sweet proteins neither introduce non-natural metabolites into the body nor disturb the balance of the amino acid pool.
Scientists already know the structures of two other sweet proteins, thaumatin and monellin (SN: 5/10/97, p.