swarming


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

swarm·ing

(swōrm'ing),
A progressive spreading by motile bacteria over the surface of a solid medium.
[A.S. swearm]

swarming

(sworm′ĭng)
The spread of bacteria over a culture medium.

swarming

1. a phenomenon observed in cultures of Proteus spp. on solid media in which there is progressive surface spreading from the parent colony.
2. the periodic bee migration of the old queen and accompanying workers and drones from a full original hive which is left to be fought over by the new young queens.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) John Arquilla and David Ronfeldt, Swarming and the Future of Combat (Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 2000).
11) There is detailed biological and behavioral information on bee swarming in the literature and in various extension publications (12,13); thus, swarming behavior is not covered in great detail here.
Experienced swarm catchers keep a kit of supplies handy during swarming season--midspring to early summer--in order to take advantage of the short window of opportunity presented by a clustered swarm.
Although there is ample knowledge about the mating behavior of most species of Culicomorpha, no studies have investigated the mating and swarming behavior of Corethrellidae (frog-biting midges).
Those marked differences meant that for some time, people thought swarming locusts and solitary grasshoppers were separate species.
A particular research project of swarming bats at three hibernation sites in Latvia was carried out in 2005-2007.
While biologists have never, to Couzin's knowledge, studied a fish school in the act of changing from one of the three swarming patterns to another, each of the patterns has been observed frequently in nature.
Subterranean-termite swarming season may hit the Los Angeles area as early as mid-April, when the wood-munching insects start searching for places to establish new colonies - such as your home.
The insects started swarming at the front of Diva Hairdressing shortly bef ore 2pm.
The past established, Berkowitz proceeds to patterns emerging in the present, describing information warfare's new concepts in terms of zapping, swarming, and network defense.
Interactions between conspecifics, different species, and genera were noted as well as information on the area occupied by the individual during the swarming and feeding times.
In all my previous reading, I recalled that swarming bees weren't supposed to sting.