swab

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swab

 [swahb]
a small pledget of cotton or gauze wrapped around the end of a slender wooden stick or wire for applying medications or obtaining specimens of secretions and other substances from body surfaces or orifices.

swab

(swob),
A wad of cotton, gauze, or other absorbent material attached to the end of a stick or clamp, used for applying or removing a substance from a surface.

swab

also

swob

(swŏb)
n.
a. A small piece of absorbent material attached to the end of a stick or wire and used for cleansing a surface, applying medicine, or collecting a sample of a substance.
b. A sample collected with a swab.
tr.v. swabbed, swabbing, swabs also swobbed or swobbing or swobs
1. To use a swab on.
2. To clean with a swab.
3. To collect a sample from (a person, for example) using a swab.

swab

(swahb)
A wad of cotton, gauze, or other absorbent material attached to the end of a stick or clamp, used to apply or remove a substance from a surface.

swab

1. A folded piece of loose-woven cotton gauze, or other absorbent material, used in surgery to apply cleaning and antiseptic solutions to the skin and to mop up free blood and other fluids in the course of the operation.
2. A small sterile twist of cotton wool on the end of an orange stick used to obtain bacterial samples for culture and examination.

swab 

A small piece of absorbent material (e.g. cotton) usually attached to the end of a stick or rod used to apply medication, to take specimens for analysis (e.g. from the bulbar conjunctiva or eyelids), or in surgery for cleaning a wound.
References in periodicals archive ?
456 children between the ages of 10 and 12 were swabbed by police in 2010 and 2011
"Staff could not see inside the leg so it was swabbed instead.
We observed a high protein yield in the swabbed samples that could possibly interfere with the results of future DNA analyses.
One of the first people to be swabbed is Tony Paris, who along with Steve Miller and Yusef Abdullahi, was wrongly jailed for the killing in 1990.
Currently, evidentiary items that have been previously screened for trace evidence are swabbed to collect DNA from skin cells or cells present in saliva or sweat along friction ridges (i.e., collars and cuffs) or other surfaces where cells may be deposited (i.e., mouth and nose areas of a ski mask).