suxamethonium


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suc·ci·nyl·cho·line

(sŭk'si-nil-kō'lēn),
A neuromuscular relaxant with short duration of action that characteristically first depolarizes the motor endplate (phase I block) but is often later associated with a curarelike, nondepolarizing neuromuscular block (phase II block); used to produce relaxation for tracheal intubation and during surgical anesthesia.

suxamethonium

A short-acting depolarizing muscles relaxant commonly used immediately after inducing general anaesthesia to facilitate the insertion of an endotracheal tube. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Anectine.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comparison of the effects of suxamethonium and tubocurarine in patients in London and New York.
For suxamethonium, 55.0% of respondents used a dose of 2 mg/kg.
Suxamethonium chloride, a depolarizing muscle relaxant due to its quick onset of action and excellent intubating conditions has remained a muscle relaxant of choice for endotracheal intubation for years together not only in planned surgeries but also in emergency surgeries.
Among the neuromuscular blocking agents, suxamethonium may be the fastest drug over onset time, as one kind of depolarization muscular
I would suggest that in this case when the airway was first lost and the patient "appeared to be splinting his chest", an appropriate dose of suxamethonium would have either resolved the issue or at least provided adequate relaxation for rescue with a laryngeal mask airway or attempted tracheal intubation (5).
A comparison of the effects of suxamethonium, atracurium and vecuronium on intracranial haemodynamics in swine.
Dad-of-two Stephen Parkins, 43, suffered a fatal cardiac arrest within minutes of being wrongly injected with torture drug Suxamethonium - used on US death row prisoners - at Birmingham's Heartlands Hospital.
Administration of suxamethonium may lead to severe bradycardia and even to cardiac arrest in a hypoxic patient.
Prolonged paralysis due to low butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity after suxamethonium administration arises from either an inherited or an acquired deficiency, but the risk of prolonged paralysis is dependent on both enzyme activity and genotype.
The most common example is having suxamethonium appropriately prepared for immediate use should laryngospasm occur.
The patient was induced with Thiopentone (4 mg/Kg, IV) and relaxed with suxamethonium (2 mg/Kg, IV).
This confusion appears to have been created by the use of a muscle relaxant called succinylcholine (also known as Suxamethonium), which, if used in large enough quantities, can cause the heart to stop, making it appear that the victim died of cardiac arrest.