suspiration


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

suspiration

(sŭs″pĭr-ā′shŭn) [L. suspiratio]
A sigh or the act of sighing.
References in periodicals archive ?
It may be that Rilke considered a similar point of origin when, in the first Elegy, he referred to "the suspiration,/the uninterrupted news that grows out of silence." And Stevens may have thought along parallel lines when, in "Man and Bottle," he likened the violence of poetry, nature, and the human mind:
As this has gone on mostly appraised approvingly since the early Cross and Thomas models (Cross, 1978), in suspiration I ask rhetorically Can you imagine that, the shame and shock to the self-respect and dignity and the affront to the freedom and literacy of centered African psychological workers that these willingly rank apotheoses of hagiographic paeans to Western-based psychological thought--insofar as they base psycho-cultural knowledge about ADP in said Western psychological thinking--represent?
I know not "seems." 'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother, Nor customary suits of solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forc'd breath, No, nor the fruitful river in the eye, Nor the dejected haviour of the visage, Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief, That can denote me truly.