suspension


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Related to suspension: Suspension of disbelief

suspension

 [sus-pen´shun]
1. temporary cessation, as of pain or a vital process.
2. a supporting from above, as in treatment where extremities are elevated with a traction device.
3. a preparation of a finely divided, undissolved substance dispersed in a liquid vehicle.
bladder neck suspension any of various methods of surgical fixation of the urethrovesical junction area and the bladder neck to restore the neck to a high retropubic position for relief of stress incontinence. Among numerous types of procedures are the Burch procedure and the Pereyra procedure. Called also colposuspension.
colloid suspension a colloid system; see colloid (def. 2). Sometimes used specifically for a sol in which the dispersed phase is solid and the particles are large enough to settle out of solution.

sus·pen·sion

(sŭs-pen'shŭn),
1. A temporary interruption of any function.
2. A hanging from a support, as used in the treatment of spinal curvatures or during the application of a plaster jacket.
3. Fixation of an organ, such as the uterus, to other tissue for support.
4. The dispersion through a liquid of a solid in finely divided particles of a size large enough to be detected by purely optic means; if the particles are too small to be seen by microscope but still large enough to scatter light (Tyndall phenomenon), they will remain dispersed indefinitely and are then called a colloidal suspension Synonym(s): coarse dispersion
5. A class of pharmacopoeial preparations of finely divided, undissolved drugs (for example, powders for suspension) dispersed in liquid vehicles for oral or parenteral use.
[L. suspensio, fr. sus-pendo, pp. -pensus, to hang up, suspend]

suspension

The temporary removal of a doctor from the GMC register (UK) or from continuing in active practice in a particular post, which may be for disciplinary reasons.

suspension

1. The termination of an activity. See Pregnancy suspension, Summary suspension.
2. A fluid solute in a solvent. See Gadolite® oral suspension, Jones suspension.

sus·pen·sion

(susp.) (sŭs-pen'shŭn)
1. Temporary interruption of any function.
2. A hanging from a support, as used in the treatment of spinal curvatures or during the application of a plaster jacket.
3. Fixation of an organ, such as the uterus, to other tissue for support.
4. The dispersion through a liquid of a solid in finely divided particles of a size large enough to be detected by purely optic means; if the particles are too small to be seen by microscope but still large enough to scatter light (Tyndall phenomenon), they will remain dispersed indefinitely and it is then called a colloidal suspension
5. A class of pharmacopeial preparations of finely divided, undissolved drugs (e.g., powders for suspension) dispersed in liquid vehicles for oral or parenteral use.
[L. suspensio, fr. sus-pendo, pp. -pensus, to hang up, suspend]

suspension

a system in which denser, microscopically visible, particles are distributed throughout a less dense liquid and maintained there, settlement being hindered or prevented either by the viscosity of the fluid or the molecular impacts of the liquid's molecules on the particles.

suppression 

The process by which the brain inhibits the retinal image (or part of it) of one eye, when both eyes are simultaneously stimulated. This occurs to avoid diplopia as in strabismus, in uncorrected anisometropia, in retinal rivalry, etc. Syn. suspenopsia (this term actually refers to voluntary suppression as occurs, for example, when using a monocular microscope with one eye); suspension (most often used when referring to partial suppression). See cheiroscope; physiological diplopia; Javal's grid; Mallett fixation disparity unit; Remy separator; retinal rivalry; Bagolini lens test; four prism dioptre base out test; FRIEND test; Turville infinity balance test; Worth's four dot test; vectogram.

sus·pen·sion

(sŭs-pen'shŭn)
1. Temporary interruption of any function.
2. A hanging from a support, as used to treat spinal curvatures.
3. Fixation of an organ to other tissue for support.
4. Dispersion through a liquid of a solid in finely divided particles of a size large enough to be detected by purely optic means.
5. Class of pharmacopoeial preparations of finely divided, undissolved drugs dispersed in liquid vehicles for oral or parenteral use.
[L. suspensio, fr. sus-pendo, pp. -pensus, to hang up, suspend]
References in periodicals archive ?
BRIDGEND Spent: PS385,000 Longest suspension: 552 days CAERPHILLY Refused.
As shown in Figure 1, a single vehicle body is supported by five suspension frames through 20 air springs.
In-school suspensions are still allowed under the new law, and advocates said Monday that more needs to be done to address the issue.
High demand for passenger cars in the market and subsequent developments in the sector will hike the demand of air suspension systems.
Based on the model in Figure 1 and Newtonian second law, the differential dynamics equations for passive suspension systems can be expressed as follows [19]:
The global automotive suspension system market is segmented on the basis of its suspension system, vehicle type, damping type, sales channel, and regional demand.
Catamco said yesterday her suspension is only a temporary setback for her administration's peace and governance initiatives.
The tweet reads: 'President @MBuhari has directed the suspension from office, with immediate effect, of the Chairman of the Special Investigation Panel for the Recovery of Public Property, Mr Okoi Obono-Obla.
It said suspension without fact-finding inquiry followed by other mandatory procedures was illegal.
The upgrade also changed the suspension settings in the user interface of Tesla.
In a statement on Saturday, DILG Secretary Eduardo Ano said that its regional office in Legazpi City served on Friday the suspension order issued by the Office of the Ombudsman.