survivor guilt


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survivor guilt

[sərvī′vər]
Etymology: OFr, survivre + ME, gilt, sin
feelings of guilt for surviving a tragedy in which others died. In some cases, the person may believe the tragedy occurred because he or she did something bad; in others, the person may feel guilty for not taking proper steps to avert the tragedy. Also called survival guilt.
Self-blame and recrimination for having survived the loss of a loved one, in particular one who has completed suicide or was involved in the same RTA/MVA

survivor guilt

A grief reaction marked by feelings of depression, loss, or responsibility experienced by persons who have survived an event in which others have lost their lives (e.g., a war, holocaust, or epidemic illness).
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of us come from these people who are suffering and many of us have real survivor guilt.
This is a story about grief, post-traumatic stress and survivor guilt, but it is not an 'issues' novel.
Upon deeper reflection, our clients sometimes identify underlying psychological issues ranging from imposter syndrome and survivor guilt, to social class change anxiety.
Let us, just for a minute, re-visit survivor guilt - this little known condition that appear to fly in the face of all logic but is now seen as a highly complex moral response to the fate of what maybe your closest friends and colleagues.
The reality of survivor guilt is * feelings of envy comparable to the concept of toward victims combat syndrome, which refers to the feelings experienced by a soldier in combat upon the death of a fellow soldier.
It includes depression, nightmares, anxiety of renewed persecution, psychosomatic symptoms, survivor guilt, emotional numbing, cognitive and memory disturbances, an inability to verbalize the traumatic experiences, heightened aggression, and a "living corpse" appearance.
It makes sense, certainly, that the double suffered acute grief as a result of Meyerhold's arrest and torture, and later faced something akin to survivor guilt (a major theme, incidentally, of Cooley's first novel, The Archivist [1998]).
Arturo also is so haunted by survivor guilt that he can no longer write.
Kindred was critically acclaimed for its perceptive examination of the effects of slavery on American society past and present, survivor guilt and gender issues.
Particularly compelling are the literary and thematic analysis of the survivor guilt of the protagonist of Fires on the Plain and the comparative reading of Musashino fujin and The Shade of Blossoms (see WLT 73:2, p.
They are as unable to dispute their survivor guilt rationally as an orphaned infant would be.