survivor guilt


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Self-blame and recrimination for having survived the loss of a loved one, in particular one who has completed suicide or was involved in the same RTA/MVA

survivor guilt

A grief reaction marked by feelings of depression, loss, or responsibility experienced by persons who have survived an event in which others have lost their lives (e.g., a war, holocaust, or epidemic illness).
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of us come from these people who are suffering and many of us have real survivor guilt. We want to give our kids a better life, yet you want this to be another Palestine?
A year ago in this column, I raised the less-understood topic of "Survivor Guilt", about which I had been counselling many victims of the London bombings as well as training HR staff to do the same.
My Tiki Girl is told by Maggie Keller, a 15-year-old who survived the car accident that killed her mother, and who now suffers from both physical injuries and survivor guilt as a result of the crash.
The second sickness, * fear survivor guilt, is a feeling of * anger responsibility or remorse for some offence and is often Sickness 3 Survivor expressed in terms of depression, envy fear, and anger (Noer, 1993).
Holocaust survivors, paradigmatic examples of trauma survivors, have been found to suffer from depression, anxiety, survivor guilt, and social withdrawal.
It includes depression, nightmares, anxiety of renewed persecution, psychosomatic symptoms, survivor guilt, emotional numbing, cognitive and memory disturbances, an inability to verbalize the traumatic experiences, heightened aggression, and a "living corpse" appearance.
He has no memory of the accident, but was suffering severe remorse, depression and "survivor guilt", the judge said.
It makes sense, certainly, that the double suffered acute grief as a result of Meyerhold's arrest and torture, and later faced something akin to survivor guilt (a major theme, incidentally, of Cooley's first novel, The Archivist [1998]).
Kindred was critically acclaimed for its perceptive examination of the effects of slavery on American society past and present, survivor guilt and gender issues.
Particularly compelling are the literary and thematic analysis of the survivor guilt of the protagonist of Fires on the Plain and the comparative reading of Musashino fujin and The Shade of Blossoms (see WLT 73:2, p.