survival curve


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curve

 [kerv]
a line that is not straight, or that describes part of a circle, especially a line representing varying values in a graph.
dose-effect curve (dose-response curve) a graphic representation of the effect caused by an agent (such as a drug or radiation) plotted against the dose, showing the relationship of the effect to changes in the dose.
growth curve the curve obtained by plotting increase in size or numbers against the elapsed time.
oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve a graphic curve representing the normal variation in the amount of oxygen that combines with hemoglobin as a function of the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The curve is said to shift to the right when less than a normal amount of oxygen is taken up by the blood at a given Po2, and to shift to the left when more than a normal amount is taken up. Factors influencing the shape of the curve include changes in the blood pH, Pco2, and temperature; the presence of carbon monoxide; alterations in the constituents of the erythrocytes; and certain disease states.
pulse curve sphygmogram.
Spee curve (curve of Spee) the anatomic curvature of the occlusal alignment of teeth, beginning at the tip of the lower canine, following the buccal cusps of the premolars and molars, and continuing to the anterior border of the ramus.
strength-duration curve a graphic representation of the relationship between the intensity of an electric stimulus at the motor point of a muscle and the length of time it must flow to elicit a minimal contraction; see also chronaxie and rheobase. In cardiac pacing it is useful in determining characteristics of a particular pacing electrode and determining the most efficient selection of pacing parameters for an appropriate safety margin.
survival curve a graph of the probability of survival versus time, commonly used to present the results of clinical trials, e.g., a graph of the fraction of patients surviving (until death, relapse, or some other defined endpoint) at each time after a certain therapeutic procedure.

survival curve

Epidemiology A curve that starts at 100% of the study population and shows the percentage of the population still surviving at successive times for as long as information is available. See Survival.

survival curve

In radiobiology, a dose response curve.
See also: curve
References in periodicals archive ?
The inappropriateness of the exponential model to describe the dataset of the respective treatment was already expected, since the survival curves achieved from the average ant survival percentage per day, for each treatment, presented a sigmoidal behaviour.
The opposite happened with the survival curves. Both models I and II, predicted correctly that at the end of the TBI treatment the survival curves would reach zero.
The medical community uses survival curves to estimate a patient's prognosis by comparing it to the experiences of other patients in like situations who received similar treatment.
The reasonableness of the fit to the bear-only data was confirmed by approximately straight lines of the log survival curves for all three years of data (Fig.
The model fit the survival curve at low and high fungicide doses but not at an intermediate dose.
[1] or by assuming that the seed survival curve follows other distributions, such as the Weibull distribution (See Appendix).
To compare survival curves, the Log Rank test was used with a 5% significance level.
Rats were monitored daily for mortality, and data were reported on the Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Calculated retained dose for each challenge group is shown on the Kaplan-Meier survival curve.
Finally, for the first time, it was possible to obtain a Kaplan-Meier survival curve of a national sample of incident dialysis patients in Brazil.
Survival curve analysis showed that those not treated with celiprolol had a significantly worse outcome than celiprolol-treated patients: survival was 80.7% in those treated with celiprolol versus 48.5% in those not treated after 11.1 years of follow-up.
Conclusion: From the K-M survival curve evaluation, neither the PFS nor OS have the statistical significance between gefitinib and afatinib.
"What's particularly impressive about immunotherapy trials is that there seems to be a population of about 20 to 30 percent of patients who are living significantly longer than expected -the long tail of the survival curve. And those are the people in whom we think there may be a particularly strong immune response against their cancer that is protecting them from getting tumor reoccurrence."