surveillance


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Related to surveillance: surveillance system

surveillance

 [sur-vāl´ans]
1. watching or monitoring.
2. a procedure used instead of quarantine to control the spread of infectious disease, involving close supervision during the incubation period of possible contacts of individuals exposed to an infectious disease.
3. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making.
surveillance: community in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of data for decision-making in the community.
surveillance: late pregnancy in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing acquisition, interpretation, and synthesis of maternal-fetal data for treatment, observation, or admission. See also pregnancy.
surveillance and/or observation a nursing intervention in the nursing minimum data set; action through which the nurse examines and monitors physical and behavioral responses to disease or injury and to the prescribed medical and/or nursing therapy.
surveillance: remote electronic in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as purposeful and ongoing acquisition of patient data via electronic modalities (telephone, video conferencing, e-mail) from distant locations as well as interpretation and synthesis of patient data for clinical decision-making with individuals or populations. See also telehealth.
surveillance: safety in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the purposeful and ongoing collection and analysis of information about the patient and the environment for use in promoting and maintaining patient safety.
skin surveillance in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the collection and analysis of patient data to maintain skin and mucous membrane integrity. See also skin care.
surveillance (omaha) in the omaha system, an intervention on the first level of the intervention scheme, defined as nursing activities of detection, measurement, critical analysis, and monitoring to indicate client status in relation to a given condition or phenomenon.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lănts),
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, or rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

surveillance

(1) The ongoing observation of the health of individuals or populations.
(2) The monitoring of diseases that have a known prevalence in a population.
(3) The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data.

surveillance

Epidemiology
1. The monitoring of diseases that have a certain prevalence in a population.
2. The ongoing systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of health data. See Epidemiologic surveillance, Fluoride surveillance, Health surveillance, HIV surveillance, Immunosurveillance, Medical surveillance, Public health surveillance, Sentinel surveillance, Site-specific surveillance.

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. The collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data; a type of observational study that involves continuous monitoring of disease occurrence within a population.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability, uniformity, and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]

sur·veil·lance

(sŭr-vā'lăns)
1. Collection, collation, analysis, and dissemination of data.
2. Ongoing scrutiny, generally using methods distinguished by practicability and rapidity, rather than complete accuracy.
[Fr. surveiller, to watch over, fr. L. super- + vigilo, to watch]
References in periodicals archive ?
"A major factor propelling China's higher growth is the government's Xue Liang program, which promotes investment in both city surveillance projects and the extension of city surveillance systems into surrounding rural areas," Cropley said.
Cockpit surveillance systems and ground manoeuvring camera systems have been installed in a majority of aircrafts.
Earlier, Dr Ibrahim Adamu, Director of Public Health, state Ministry of Health, said the contribution from WHO was crucial as disease control can be effected through surveillance system being the only way to keep track of the diseases.
Future sentinel surveillance programs are unlikely to benefit from an evaluation component
its customers to take control of their surveillance storage with WD's Purple
These matters cannot properly be considered without first thinking more broadly about surveillance culture.
Indeed, it manages to anchor and give shape to a wide array of insights borrowed from Gender Studies in a way that shows their relevance to scholars of surveillance. Contributions by Mia Fischer, Corrine L.
Privacy International hopes that the index will serve as an important tool for journalists, activists and human rights campaigners, and trigger greater public debate about the ethics and legality of such surveillance techniques.
All surveillance videos should be preserved until the statute of limitations (time deadline to assert a claim) has expired or the plaintiff's claim and/ or case has concluded.
To ensure that the installers and system integrators working in the security & surveillance sector get trained on the latest technologies, get certified and stay updated, we today launch the myWD Certified Surveillance Storage Provider Program." said Khwaja Saifuddin, Senior Sales Director, Middle East, Africa and India, Western Digital.
At a recent roundtable of academics and privacy advocates discussing surveillance studies and inequality, the conversation variously turned to consumer surveillance, new technologies, and the weakened legislative climate on privacy in both the United States and Canada.
Surveillance culture is facilitated because a person consents to it as an insecure citizen.

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