surround

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sur·round

(sŭr-ownd'),
Milieu; environment.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sur·round

(sŭr-ownd')
Milieu; environment.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
From the vague accounts we sometimes have of their beauty, many people are apt to picture to themselves enamelled and softly swelling plains, shaded over with delicious groves, and watered by purling brooks, and the entire country but little elevated above the surrounding ocean.
As we slowly advanced up the bay, numerous canoes pushed off from the surrounding shores, and we were soon in the midst of quite a flotilla of them, their savage occupants struggling to get aboard of us, and jostling one another in their ineffectual attempts.
We obtained a wide view over the surrounding country: to the north a swampy moorland extended, but to the south we had a scene of savage magnificence, well becoming Tierra del Fuego.
The evening was calm and bright, and we enjoyed a fine view of the surrounding isles.
The surrounding islands all consist of conical masses of greenstone, associated sometimes with less regular hills of baked and altered clay-slate.
The surrounding hills rise abruptly from the water to the height of forty to eighty feet, though on the southeast and east they attain to about one hundred and one hundred and fifty feet respectively, within a quarter and a third of a mile.
This makes a difference of level, at the outside, of six or seven feet; and yet the water shed by the surrounding hills is insignificant in amount, and this overflow must be referred to causes which affect the deep springs.
It was typical of the man that he should be wholly indifferent to his surroundings, although his looks entirely belied any assumption that he was of particularly heroic strain.
And not only was the young lieutenant outwardly careless of the immediate future and of his surroundings, but actually so.
So it was that these surrounding heights, already established and to a certain extent proved, were retained.
By giving the balloon these cubic dimensions, and filling it with hydrogen gas, instead of common air--the former being fourteen and a half times lighter and weighing therefore only two hundred and seventy-six pounds--a difference of three thousand seven hundred and twenty-four pounds in equilibrium is produced; and it is this difference between the weight of the gas contained in the balloon and the weight of the surrounding atmosphere that constitutes the ascensional force of the former.
The capacity of this interior balloon was only sixty-seven thousand cubic feet: it was to float in the fluid surrounding it.