surrogate

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Related to surrogates: surrogate mother

surrogate

 [sur´o-gat]
a substitute; a thing or person that takes the place of something or someone else, as a drug used in place of another, or, in psychoanalysis, the projection onto another person of one's mother or father image and unconscious and inappropriate response to that person with the feelings and attitudes felt for the real mother or father.

sur·ro·gate

(sŭr'ŏ-găt),
1. A person who functions in another's life as a substitute for some third person, such as a relative who assumes the nurturing and other responsibilities of the absent parent.
2. A person who reminds one of another person so that one uses the first as an emotional substitute for the second.
[L. surrogo, to put in another's place]

surrogate

/sur·ro·gate/ (sur´o-git) a substitute; a thing or person that takes the place of something or someone else, as a drug used in place of another, or a person who takes the place of another in someone's affective existence.

surrogate

(sûr′ə-gĭt, -gāt′, sŭr′-)
n.
1. One that takes the place of another; a substitute.
2.
a. A person or animal that functions as a substitute for another, as in a social or family role.
b. A surrogate mother.
3. In Freudian psychology, a figure of authority who takes the place of the father or mother in a person's unconscious or emotional life.
adj.
Substitute.
tr.v. (-gāt′) surro·gated, surro·gating, surro·gates
1. To put in the place of another, especially as a successor; replace.
2. To appoint (another) as a replacement for oneself.

surrogate

[sur′əgāt]
Etymology: L, surrogare, to substitute
1 a substitute; a person or thing that replaces another.
2 a person who represents and acts as a parent, taking the place of the father or mother.
3 (in psychoanalysis) a substitute parental figure, a symbolic image or representation of another, as may occur in a dream. The identity of the person represented often remains in the unconscious.

surrogate

Research
A test or species (of animals) used in the place of another test or target species.

sur·ro·gate

(sŭr'ŏ-găt)
1. A person who functions in another's life as a substitute for some third person, such as a relative who assumes the nurturing and other responsibilities of the absent parent.
2. A person who so reminds one of another person that one uses the first as an emotional substitute for the second.
[L. surrogo, to put in another's place]

surrogate,

n 1., a replacement.
2., in homeopathy, a substitute medicine for the exact remedy. See also simillimum.

sur·ro·gate

(sŭr'ŏ-găt)
Person who functions in another's life as a substitute for some third person.
[L. surrogo, to put in another's place]

surrogate (sur´əgit),

n a substitute; a person or thing that replaces another.

surrogate

a substitute; a thing or animal that takes the place of something or some animal, as a drug used in place of another, or, in animal husbandry, an animal which takes the place of another in the family or herd environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since commercial surrogacy is one of India's lucrative industries, clinics carefully monitor the surrogates from conception until birth, and this typically requires that they stay at the clinics until the baby is born.
While Pande's study may not have a tidy ending, the readers are left feeling hopeful for the surrogates and their futures.
There are also state-sanctioned requirements such as age restrictions, that surrogates have already given birth or experienced a viable pregnancy, and that parties undergo counseling that may seem paternalistic but that work to ensure that the parties are aware of the choices they are making given the nature of the contract for embodied labor.
191) These legal rules attempt to minimize the commercialization of surrogacy as well as the potential exploitation by surrogates of desperate commissioning parents.
Any commands you issue for the surrogate applies to all five soldiers,' Current video game technology lacks an easy-to-use method to issue such simultaneous commands to all members of a group.
67) Through governmental oversight of the clinics, bad practices can be exposed and the rights of the surrogates protected.
Surrogate mothers in India cost considerably lower, roughly about a fourth of what they would cost in the US.
According to Langevin, this framework would recognize the value of women's work as surrogates.
Thai surrogate Pattaramon Chanbua claims an Australian couple took home a healthy baby girl she carried for them but left her twin brother Gammy because of his disability.
The low-cost technology, skilled doctors, scant bureaucracy and a plentiful supply of surrogates have made India a preferred destination for fertility tourism, attracting nationals from Britain, the United States, Australia and Japan, to name a few.
Thus prospective parents often choose egg and sperm donors based on what they consider genetic likeness to themselves and/or markers of socially dominant characteristics but they choose surrogates using different standards, including the number of successful pregnancies the surrogate has had, her age and health, and her mental health history (Thompson, Making Parents).
The couple, despite being devastated by the news themselves, showed concern about the surrogate mother's health and made it clear that they did not blame her for what happened.