surrogate

(redirected from surrogates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to surrogates: surrogate mother

surrogate

 [sur´o-gat]
a substitute; a thing or person that takes the place of something or someone else, as a drug used in place of another, or, in psychoanalysis, the projection onto another person of one's mother or father image and unconscious and inappropriate response to that person with the feelings and attitudes felt for the real mother or father.

sur·ro·gate

(sŭr'ŏ-găt),
1. A person who functions in another's life as a substitute for some third person, such as a relative who assumes the nurturing and other responsibilities of the absent parent.
2. A person who reminds one of another person so that one uses the first as an emotional substitute for the second.
[L. surrogo, to put in another's place]

surrogate

/sur·ro·gate/ (sur´o-git) a substitute; a thing or person that takes the place of something or someone else, as a drug used in place of another, or a person who takes the place of another in someone's affective existence.

surrogate

(sûr′ə-gĭt, -gāt′, sŭr′-)
n.
1. One that takes the place of another; a substitute.
2.
a. A person or animal that functions as a substitute for another, as in a social or family role.
b. A surrogate mother.
3. In Freudian psychology, a figure of authority who takes the place of the father or mother in a person's unconscious or emotional life.
adj.
Substitute.
tr.v. (-gāt′) surro·gated, surro·gating, surro·gates
1. To put in the place of another, especially as a successor; replace.
2. To appoint (another) as a replacement for oneself.

surrogate

[sur′əgāt]
Etymology: L, surrogare, to substitute
1 a substitute; a person or thing that replaces another.
2 a person who represents and acts as a parent, taking the place of the father or mother.
3 (in psychoanalysis) a substitute parental figure, a symbolic image or representation of another, as may occur in a dream. The identity of the person represented often remains in the unconscious.

surrogate

Research
A test or species (of animals) used in the place of another test or target species.

sur·ro·gate

(sŭr'ŏ-găt)
1. A person who functions in another's life as a substitute for some third person, such as a relative who assumes the nurturing and other responsibilities of the absent parent.
2. A person who so reminds one of another person that one uses the first as an emotional substitute for the second.
[L. surrogo, to put in another's place]

surrogate,

n 1., a replacement.
2., in homeopathy, a substitute medicine for the exact remedy. See also simillimum.

sur·ro·gate

(sŭr'ŏ-găt)
Person who functions in another's life as a substitute for some third person.
[L. surrogo, to put in another's place]

surrogate (sur´əgit),

n a substitute; a person or thing that replaces another.

surrogate

a substitute; a thing or animal that takes the place of something or some animal, as a drug used in place of another, or, in animal husbandry, an animal which takes the place of another in the family or herd environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
In practice, it may now be said that many lawyers spend more time with clients explaining and executing their durable powers of attorney and designations of health care surrogates than explaining and signing wills and trusts.
While there are no general principals or rules of thumb as to when clients will prefer durable health care surrogates or traditional health care surrogates, after a year of practice, it appears that many married couples --particularly those in long-term first marriages and those who are older--are more comfortable with and desire creating durable health care surrogates.
Natalie points out that the Surrogacy UK report found 75% of surrogates and intended parents want to remove the legal uncertainty over parenthood at birth, and says: "It's so clear that the current law is at odds with what's in the best interests and welfare of the children, and it creates a huge amount of anxiety and stress.
BUYING A LIFE IN the UK, surrogates can only be paid expenses for carrying a child for someone else, and the Surrogacy UK report shows widespread rejection of any move towards commercialisation of the process.
cc/48MS-SUFD (stating the estimated range of costs for experienced surrogates and those residing in California).
11) The couple realized this was a viable option and quickly found a willing surrogate, Valerie.
Furthermore, the lack of medicalization of childbirth for poor women aids rather than conflicts with the clinic's informal mandate of cesarean section for childbirth, since most first-time surrogates have likely never had one.
Surrogates cannot demand higher wages without facing the stigma of becoming bad surrogates, who are both unfit as mothers and similar to prostitutes.
174) For the purposes of this Article, the regulations that are most important are those that surround the business of gestational surrogacy, in particular those that might protect surrogates from exploitation in unequal bargaining positions.
Through conversations with doctors, surrogate counselors, and brokers, Pande illustrates the thinking behind recruitment campaigns and the work that is put into convincing the surrogates that they are simply providing a service for someone who cannot carry a child.
In the much of the past, surrogacy simply involved another woman - the surrogate was impregnated by the prospective father and bore the child for the intended couple.
It is estimated that the number of children born of surrogate mothers in India between the years 2004 and 2008 was over 5,000.