surrender


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

surrender

Social medicine
The voluntary transfer of parental rights to a child to an agency or court.

surrender

(sŭr-ĕn′dĕr) [O.Fr. surrendre]
Giving up a health care professional license, e.g., at retirement or as a means of resolving a disciplinary action brought forward by a health care supervisory board.
References in periodicals archive ?
Explaining that no firearm would be refused, Ch Insp Gould added: "The surrender not only applies to firearms and ammunition, but includes replica firearms, air weapons, BB guns, imitation firearms, component parts and other ballistic items.
Make the return-of-money period 30 days, if the contract owner submits a surrender form within 14 days of asking for the surrender.
And now they are being used to form part of a statue being sculpted by Alfie Bradley as part of the Save a Life, Surrender Your Knife campaign.
Besides, there is also a difference of opinion on the surrender policy.
If you stop paying premium before the end of the policy term, you are entitled to receive an amount, called surrender value, depending on the number of years completed, the premium and the bonus received.
2) In general, primary insurers have historically profited from lapse or surrender of policies, (3) especially by insureds with impaired health (see Doherty and Singer, 2002, pp.
Some cases in which the tenant successfully argued an imphed surrender having the effect of releasing the tenant from future liability are reviewed below.
Dyfed-Powys Police have seen one of the best responses to the call for surrender of weapons in their Llanelli division, where nearly all of the 389 guns in circulation have been handed in.
There are drawn symbols at our hospitals of a pair of hands holding a baby, but we didn't think a lot of people knew what the symbol meant, that it was about the safe surrender program,'' Radford said.
Presently, the contract is worth $300,000, and has no surrender charges.
In the past, companies facing these situations had three choices, depending on the type of policy: 1) recover some of the investment and surrender the policy for its cash value; 2) allow it to lapse, and write off years of premium payments as a necessary but unrecoverable business cost; or 3) continue to pay premiums until the death of the insured.
In some instances the best alternative is neither to hold the policy nor to surrender it.