surgical training

surgical training

The teaching of a junior doctor how to be a surgeon. In the UK, the first post-medical school year is as a pre-registration house officer (PRHO, now known as Foundation Year 1—FY1), at the end of which he or she is eligible for full GMC registration. Second-year juniors aspiring to become surgeons apply for a senior house officer (SHO, now known as Foundation Year 2—FY2) post in accident and emergency (A&E) medicine, or in one of the surgical specialties (i.e., working as a PRHO, but in a field of surgery) posts, which are generally of six months duration.

During FY2, the junior applies for an SHO Basic Surgical Training rotation, which lasts 2.5 to 3.0 years, and involves 6-months’ training in each of various surgical specialties, often with more time spent training in intensive care and A&E. During their surgical rotation, juniors are immersed in a formal educational programme and training towards the membership to the Royal College of Surgery (MRCS) examination, facilitated by the Royal College of Surgeons’ educational course (the STEP course), which can be followed at their employing hospital. Junior trainees must take a Basic Surgical Skills course and test and should take both Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) and Care of the Critically Ill Surgical Patient (CCrISP) courses. Most SHOs take the MRCS examination about 3 years into their SHO training.

On passing the MRCS, trainees seek a higher surgical training (HST) post with its national training number (NTN). HST is now a structured, formalised 6-year period of training; the first 3 years are generally undertaken in district general hospitals where trainees gain a wide range of experience covering various sub-specialties. In general surgery, the trainees may work for surgeons with a sub-specialty interest in: breast, endocrine, vascular, upper GI (stomach, small bowel, liver and pancreas), or colorectal surgery. One of the 6 years is designated for research which may have already been fulfilled before obtaining an NTN, and does not need repeating. The final 2 years of HST are usually spent in trainee’s chosen sub-specialty. During the final year the trainee takes the inter-collegiate specialty examination, either in general surgery or in the chosen sub-specialty, which includes neuro-, cardiac, ENT, trauma and orthopaedics (including its sub-specialties), paediatric, urology, and maxillofacial surgery.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Waris Farooka from Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore expressed his thoughts on 'Simulation in Surgical Training'.
"The decision to focus on kidney cancer and the development of a surgical training model for robotassisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was due to both my academic interest in the kidney and because the disease has personally affected my family."
"The company already boasts a range of exceptionally advanced products, so it was interesting for us to be able to combine that with our in-house expertise to create a multi-functional, mixed reality surgical training tool."
Having spent the majority of his higher surgical training at RJAH, Mr Singh said he feels 'immensely privileged' that the trust has appointed him.
Funding for the theatre will also aid surgical training and potentially deliver sustainable high quality vascular services to the whole of North Wales".
This review covers the concept of cadaveric dissection in terms of teaching anatomy and post-graduate surgical training.
Speaking about it, lead author Ioannis Pavlidis, said, aACoeIt appears that by removing external stress factors associated with the notoriously competitive and harsh lifestyle of surgery residencies, stress levels during inanimate surgical training plummet.
He explained: "I qualified from Leicester University in 2002 and then undertook ophthalmic higher surgical training in Hampshire and then Wales.
A former employee claimed that there are fridges packed with human remains from surgical training including heads, torsos, arms and legs.
He came to America to continue his education, doing his internship in Milwaukee, WI then his residency in surgical training at affiliated hospitals with the New Jersey College of Medicine.
As surgeons it is crucial that we work hard to spread the word about surgical training, education and innovation and as such, the symposium was incredibly valuable for both surgeons and the public alike.