surgical neck fracture

surgical neck fracture

A fracture that affects the surgical neck of the humerus, which affects two groups of patients:
(1) Young patients, usually male, typically due to high velocity trauma, often accompanied by impaction of the bony fragments. The bone quality is usually good, with thick cortices and dense cancellous structure which responds well to various surgical techniques, including open reduction and internal fixation.
(2) Elderly patients, more often female, following minor trauma due to fall from height. The bone quality is usually poor with thin cortices and porous cancellous bone, which may be accompanied by medical comorbidity and often responds poorly to treatment.

Management
Stabilisation of surgical neck fractures is indicated for multiple trauma, displaced unstable fractures, when accompanied by other upper extremity fractures, and when accompanied by vascular injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
Group V is composed of displaced lesser tuberosity fractures that occur as isolated avulsion fractures, such as after a seizure or in association with a non-displaced surgical neck fracture.
Three subtypes include angulated, separated or unimpacted, and comminuted surgical neck fractures.
1 fracture may be represented by a minimally displaced fracture, a displaced two-part surgical neck fracture, a displaced two-part greater tuberosity fracture, or a three-part variant with significant displacement of both the surgical neck and greater tuberosity with valgus impaction (Fig.
Four of these cases were three-part fractures and two of the fractures were two-part surgical neck fractures treated with percutaneous pinning.
Operative versus non-operative treatment for two-part surgical neck fractures of the proximal humerus.
Functional outcome was also influenced by pattern of fracture with best results in isolated 2-part greater tuberosity fracture (Constant-Murley score - 90) followed by 2-part surgical neck fractures (77.
14) Surgical neck fractures that are reducible and in patients with high-quality bone do not necessarily need ORIF and can be treated with minimally invasive techniques.
Koval KJ, Blair B, Takei R, et al: Surgical neck fractures of the proximal humerus: A laboratory evaluation of ten fixation techniques.