surgical emphysema


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Related to surgical emphysema: flail chest, Tension pneumothorax

sur·gi·cal em·phy·se·ma

subcutaneous emphysema from gas trapped in the tissues by an operation or injury, frequently seen after carbon dioxide insufflation during laproscopic procedures.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sur·gi·cal em·phy·se·ma

(sŭr'ji-kăl em'fi-sē'mă)
Subcutaneous emphysema from air trapped in the tissues by an operation or injury.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

surgical emphysema

Air or gas in the tissues, most commonly in the neck as a result of leakage from a lung, injury to the OESOPHAGUS or fracture of the wall of one of the nasal SINUSES. There is a characteristic crackling effect when the affected area is pressed with the fingers. Surgical emphysema is not, in itself, harmful and the air soon absorbs if further leakage from the source is prevented.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Periorbital oedema and surgical emphysema, an unusual complication of a dental procedure: a case report.
Surgical emphysema developed in two patients, one in immediate post-op period and was relieved by removing the wound sutures and change of tracheostomy tube of smaller size.
One (7.69%) patient developed surgical emphysema which was detected post-operatively and a tube thoracostomy was made.
Pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax, pleural effusion, and surgical emphysema after routine apicectomy caused by vomiting.
A computed tomography (CT) scan showed extensive surgical emphysema but no underlying pathology.
On day 10, problems with ventilation necessitated recruitment manoeuvres with a Mapleson C circuit, following which severe surgical emphysema was noted.
Variables on which information was collected were baseline and preoperative (age, gender, mode of admission, diagnosis, hemoglobin, total leukocyte count and ultrasound findings with emphasis on the number of calculi), operative variables (operating room time, status of gall bladder, presence of adhesions, perforation of gallbladder with spillage of stones, common bile duct injury, conversion to open cholecystectomy and the reasons behind it) and postoperative variables (death of patient, surgical site infection, post operative shoulder pain, port site hernia, surgical emphysema, missed stones, length of hospital stay and the need for re intervention).
Intermediate: Surgical emphysema, tube blockage, tube displacement, stomal infection.
In patients who had an initial CXR, clinical and/or radiological findings confirmed 47 (36.7%) patients with haemopneumothoraces, 49 (38.3 %) with pneumothoraces, 26 (20.3%) with haemothoraces, 4 (3.1%) with significant surgical emphysema with fractures, and 2 (1.6%) with abnormalities on CXR.