surgical drain


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Related to surgical drain: Penrose drain

surgical drain

A drain that withdraws blood, pus, or other fluids from an operative site. It may be placed in an abscess, e.g., to speed recovery from a localized infection, or in a cyst or seroma, to remove collected fluids and cells. Drains may also be inserted into obstructed organs to relieve pressure resulting from fluid buildup within the organs. Surgical drains are composed of a variety of substances, such as latex or plastic.
See also: drain
References in periodicals archive ?
Reduced hospital stay can be reduced by watertight anastomoses and avoidance of the surgical drain, local anesthesia injection in the wound, postoperative analgesia with ketorolac infusion, and a care pathway involving patient awareness of postoperative stay.
But new ultrasonic technology that creates an almost bloodless surgical field reduces the risk of expanding hematomas and makes it possible to decrease reliance on surgical drains.
A surgical drain was placed postoperatively and was removed when minimal collection was noted after four days.
On the next day, clear fluid appeared from a mediastinal surgical drain initially at 20 ml/hour increasing to 300 ml/hour.
Procedure: The blood from the surgical drain is collected into the sterile canisters and subjected to filtration through membrane called leucocyte filter (Having a pore size of 40 microns) and fat filter.
The invention has expanded to encompass 10 surgical drain designs, antibiotic bags, and intravenous containers.
Applications include IV catheter lines, epidural lines, Foley catheter lines, endotracheal and gastric nasal tubes, chest tubes, urinary drainage tubes, ostomy and surgical drain lines, negative pressure wound therapy tubes, and multiple lines on a patient or in a surgical field.
It is recommended that a surgical drain be placed for 1 or 2 days to prevent seroma or hematoma formation.