surgical decompression


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surgical decompression

1. The freeing of a trapped body part, e.g., the operative release of a nerve from entrapment by neighboring structures.
2. The surgical evacuation of fluids or clot from a closed space.
See also: decompression
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
This surgical decompression procedure involves extensive dissection for detachment of the bilateral paravertebral muscles (PVMs) from the spinous processes and the lamina.
All patients were treated with surgical decompression and stabilisation with intraoperative MEPS.
Presenting symptoms range from numbness and tingling in the ulnar nerve distribution, often accompanied by weakness of the grip, to clawed fingers and occasionally severe intrinsic wasting.[3] If adequate conservative nonsurgical treatment fails to relieve progressive symptoms and dysfunction, surgical decompression is indicated, typically involving either superficial approaches ( in situ decompression and anterior subcutaneous transposition) or deep approaches (medial epicondylectomy or anterior sub- or intramuscular transposition).[7],[8],[9],[10],[11],[12],[13]
Furthermore, having private insurance (p = 0.068), undergoing a posterior approach (p = 0.087), and not requiring surgical decompression (p = 0.070) each showed a trend toward selection for MIS.
[5] attested the mortality rate to be higher in patients who did not receive surgical decompression compared to those who received intervention.
Results of surgical decompression of ulnar nerve in leprosy.
Rubin, "Infraorbital nerve surgical decompression for chronic infraorbital nerve hyperesthesia," Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol.
To prevent irreversible tissue necrosis, prompt diagnosis with subsequent emergent surgical decompression with fasciotomy is mandated [9].
Most of the reported cases in literature received surgical decompression while Sorafenib treatment was also discussed in literature [5].
(viii) The combined action of IPD and surgical decompression associated with interbody fusion is not clear.
It is not recommended to undertake surgical decompression for traumatic canal compromise in TLBF when there is a concern of static canal stenosis causing neurological dysfunction, or fear of neurological deterioration during rehabilitation.
Our reviewfound that 69% of patients with an Onodi cell mucocele experienced an improvement in vision after surgical decompression. The vast majority of these patients underwent endoscopic decompression; the timing of surgical decompression did not appear to affect outcomes in terms of vision.