surgeon general


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sur·geon gen·er·al

(sŭr'jŏn jen'ĕr-ăl),
The chief medical officer in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, or Public Health Service. In some foreign military services, any member of the medical corps who has the rank of general, not necessarily the chief medical officer.

Surgeon General

n. pl. Surgeons General Abbr. SG
1. The chief medical officer in the US Public Health Service or in a state public health service.
2. The chief general officer in the medical departments of the US Army, Navy, or Air Force.

surgeon general

(in the United States) the chief medical officer of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Public Health Service. In other countries, the title may indicate any physician with the rank of general.

Surgeon General

A physician appointed by the US President and approved by the Senate who acts as a voice for public health issues. When the position was first created in the 1860s, the Surgeon General oversaw most of the civilian federal health institution, duties which now fall to the Assistant Director of Health and Human Services.
References in periodicals archive ?
Novello championed women's health during her term, reminding the audience that during her time as surgeon general, the first Government Accountability Office report was released implementing the rule that "if a woman pays her taxes, she deserves her own research," as well as the first national report on HIV/AIDS and children.
Second, the role of the Surgeon General is different now than it was 30 years ago because the circumstances surrounding America's national health are different.
Last January we celebrated the 30th anniversary of the landmark report on smoking and health issued by Surgeon General Luther Terry.
Surgeon General may set the stage for a wave of activism in the government's Public Health Service.
I hope this marks a new period of cooperation between our industry and the Surgeon General.
The Medallion is the highest honor that the Surgeon General can confer on an individual or organization.
We couldn't be happier that Surgeon General Murthy has recognized in this initiative the benefits of pet ownership and how regularly walking the family dog is great for both the pet and the pet owner," said AVMA President Dr.
Benjamin also thanked Acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak, MD, MPH, who served for 18 months following Regina Benjamin's departure.
Richard Carmona, surgeon general during President Bush's first term, testified in Congress Tuesday about the relentless pressure he endured, and only sometimes resisted, to tailor his medical pronouncements to fit the administration's political agenda.
Yet in 2004, when support had begun to decline and John Kerry was allegedly giving aid and comfort to the enemy, an almost identical follow-up report released in 2005 by the same Surgeon General team found that only 50 percent now reported low or very low morale.
But the increased folic acid should be taken through folic acid supplements, not by increasing the number of multivitamins, the Surgeon General said, because of the risk of vitamin A poisoning.
Forty years ago the United States Surgeon General issued his landmark report formally documenting the role tobacco plays in causing cancer of the larynx and lung in men and chronic bronchitis in men and women.