surface tension


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Related to surface tension: viscosity, capillary action, capillarity

tension

 [ten´shun]
1. the act of stretching.
2. the condition of being stretched or strained; the degree to which something is stretched or strained.
3. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, such as oxygen in blood.
5. mental, emotional, or nervous strain.
6. hostility between two or more individuals or groups.
arterial tension blood pressure within an artery.
carbon dioxide tension the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood, noted as pCO2 in blood gas analysis. See also respiration.
electric tension electromotive force.
intraocular tension intraocular pressure.
surface tension tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.

sur·face ten·sion (γ, σ),

the expression of intermolecular attraction at the surface of a liquid, in contact with air or another gas, a solid, or another immiscible liquid, tending to pull the molecules of the liquid inward from the surface; dimensional formula: mt-2.

surface tension

the tendency of a liquid to minimize the area of its surface by contracting. This property causes liquids to rise in a capillary tube, affects the exchange of gases in the pulmonary alveoli, and alters the ability of various liquids to wet another surface.

sur·face ten·sion

(sŭr'făs ten'shŭn)
The expression of intermolecular attraction at the surface of a liquid, in contact with air or another gas, a solid, or another immiscible liquid, tending to pull the molecules of the liquid inward from the surface; dimensional formula: mt-2.

surface tension

A property of a liquid surface, arising from unbalanced molecular cohesive forces, in which the surface behaves as if it were covered by a thin elastic membrane under tension and tends to adopt a spherical shape.

Surface tension

The attraction of molecules in a fluid for each other.
Mentioned in: Surfactant

tension

1. the act of stretching or the condition of being stretched or strained.
2. the partial pressure of a component of a gas mixture or of a gas dissolved in a fluid, e.g. of oxygen in blood.
3. voltage.

arterial tension
blood pressure within an artery.
tension band wires
heavy gauge wire is inserted in fracture fragments and around pins placed in the fragments in order and adjusted to create compression on the fracture site. Suited for treatment of apophyseal or epiphyseal avulsion fractures. See also tension band plate.
intraocular tension
intraocular pressure; intraocular tension, normal intraocular tension being indicated by Tn, while T + 1, T + 2, etc. indicate increased tension, and T − 1, T − 2, etc. indicate decreased tension.
tension line
the direction of pull on the skin in any given region. A map of the body, drawn to show the various lines of pull, or tension, is useful in planning surgical closure of skin incisions, particularly ones with defects, in order to minimize forces that might cause dehiscence.
surface tension
tension or resistance that acts to preserve the integrity of a surface.
tissue tension
a state of equilibrium between tissues and cells that prevents overaction of any part.
References in periodicals archive ?
The planning matrix obtained for the CCRD is shown in Table 2, where the variables (pH and temperature) in response to surface tension are presented.
05) was performed on surface tension and emulsification index data to determine significant difference potential among the isolates.
Biosurfactant produced by this bacterium reduced the surface tension significantly which indicates their potential application in different industries.
Those regions become richer in higher surface tension coating vehicle (and may experience evaporative cooling which further raises surface tension) and a surface tension gradient is set up which causes flow of material to the edges.
In order for a liquid to be able to wet a surface the surface tension of the liquid must be lower than the surface energy of the surface.
The glycerol concentration was set at 75 wt%, but two different types of alcohols were used (ethanol and isopropanol) to vary the viscosity and surface tension.
Surface tension makes water droplets form bridges between sand grains and hold them together.
NOTE: Dirt, oil, and soap all weaken or destroy surface tension.
The surface tension value of starch, surfactant and their mixtures are given in Table 1-3.
8221; Not only do fluorosurfactants reduce or altogether prevent these defects, their exceptionally low surface tension also allows coating systems to overcome low surface tension contaminants, such as silicone, grease, and oil on the substrate.
Surface tension is an important physical property that affects various coating operations.
It contains a foaming agent comprising a derivatized dimethicone, a surface tension adjusting agent, and a warming agent comprising glycerin.

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