suprofen


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suprofen

 [soo-pro´fen]
a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug applied topically to the conjunctiva to inhibit miosis during ophthalmic surgery.

suprofen

/su·pro·fen/ (soo-pro´fen) a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug applied topically to the conjunctiva to inhibit miosis during ophthalmic surgery.

suprofen

[səprō′fən]
an oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory analgesic.
indications It is used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain and primary dysmenorrhea.
contraindications It is contraindicated for patients who experience asthma, rhinitis, urticaria, or other allergic reactions from the use of aspirin or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. It is not recommended for patients with a history of peptic ulcers or risk of other types of GI bleeding.
adverse effects Reported side effects include severe flank pain, nausea, vomiting, dyspepsia, abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, flatulence, headache, dizziness, sedation, and sleep disturbances.
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More than 100 currently used drugs are known substrates of CYP2C9 which corresponds to 10-20% of commonly prescribed drugs, such as meloxicam, suprofen, tolbutamide and S-warfarin.
36,37) Although unavailable in the UK, the NSAID suprofen 1% used four times daily has been demonstrated to significantly reduce signs and symptoms in CLGPC patients compared to a placebo.
Comparative efficacy of topical applied flurbiprofen, diclofenac, tolmetin, and suprofen for the treatment of experimentally induced blood aqueous barrier disruption in dogs.
For example, adverse event reports conclusively established that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug suprofen caused flank pain syndrome.
The Importance of Adverse Reaction Reporting by Physicians: Suprofen and the Flank Pain Syndrome, 259 JAMA 1203 (1988).
Examples include the use of zonal elution to examine the displacement of D,L-thyroxine and D,L-tryptophan from HSA by bilirubin or caprylate (226); the competition of R/S-warfarin with racemic oxazepam, lorazepam, and their hemisuccinate derivatives on an HSA column (211); the direct or allosteric competition of octanoic acid on immobilized HSA for the binding sites of R/S-warfarin, phenylbutazone, tolbutamide, R/S-oxazepam hemisuccinate, ketoprofen A/B, and suprofen A/B (213); the competition of R-warfarin and L-tryptophan with D-tryptophan (207) or L-thyroxine and related thyronine compounds on HSA (203,208); and the displacement of R- and S-ibuprofen by one another at their binding regions on HSA (227).
Suprol is a tradename for suprofen, invented by J&J's Belgian subsidiary in 1972 and sold in Europe by J&J's subsidiaries there beginning in 1982.
The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) suprofen 1% used four times daily has also demonstrated efficacy in treating CLGPC, (64) but this is not available in the UK.
The reduction of only 27% in protein levels, contrasts the observations of a previous study, which proved that topical flurbiprofen, diclofenac, and suprofen were effective at preventing blood-aqueous barrier disruption after paracentesis in dogs (WARD, 1996).
Quantitative determination of suprofen in human plasma and urine by fully automated high-performance liquid chromatography.