supraspinatus muscle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

su·pra·spi·na·tus mus·cle

(sū'pră-spī-nā'tŭs mŭs'ĕl)
Origin, supraspinous fossa of scapula; insertion, greater tuberosity of humerus; action, initiates abduction of arm; nerve supply, suprascapular from fifth and sixth cervical.
Synonym(s): musculus supraspinatus [TA] , supraspinous muscle.

supraspinatus muscle

Shoulder muscle. Origin: medial supraspinous fossa of scapula. Insertion: greater tubercle of humerus. Nerve: suprascapular (C4-C6). Action: abducts arm.
See also: muscle
References in periodicals archive ?
supraspinatus muscle thickness, CSA of fossa and supraspinatus muscle and calculated occupational ratio after US measurements performed four times.
Caption: Figure 5: Sagittal T1 MRI: (1) humeral head, (2) acromion, (3) supraspinatus muscle, (4) infraspinatus muscle, (5) teres minor muscle, and (6) teres major rupture.
Function of supraspinatus muscle with torn cuff Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.
A complete tear of supraspinatus muscle occurred in 55% of the cases, a partial tear of supraspinatus muscle happened in 15%, a complete tear of the tendon of supraspinatus and subscapularis muscles was in 20%, and a complete tear of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles occurred in 10% of the cases.
In this study, [F.sub.physio] of the supraspinatus muscle was set to 117 N (Hughes and An, 1996).
Additionally, an MRI was scheduled demonstrating a partial thickness tear of the supraspinatus tendon, fluid in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa compatible with shoulder impingement and moderate degenerative changes at the acromioclavicular joint encroaching upon the supraspinatus muscle tendon complex.
Isolated supraspinatus muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration associated with recurrent anterior shoulder instability: A case report and review of the literature.
Primary intramuscular hydatidosis of supraspinatus muscle. Arch Orthop Trauma Surg.2001;121: 93-948.
The supraspinatus muscle arises from the posterior aspect of the scapula, just above the scapular spine, and courses horizontally and anteriorly at the level of the acromioclavicular joint, a good landmark for its musculotendinous junction.
Local peri-scapular wasting, especially the supraspinatus muscle, viewed from above brings suprascapular nerve entrapment into the differential diagnosis.