suprasegmental


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suprasegmental

(soo″pră-sĕg-mĕn′tăl) [″ + segmentum, segment]
Located above the segmented portion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Random limb movements have been observed to visibly synchronize with the suprasegmental rhythms of connected speech, and the strength of this tendency may constitute one predictor of social facility during later development (Condon, 1985; Reddy, Hay, Murray, & Trevarthen, 1997).
To complement this, there are specific materials to teach suprasegmental features (Anderson-Hsieh, 1990).
One of the possible reasons might lie in the circumstance that quantity degree as a suprasegmental feature cannot be represented as a single linear characteristic, but rather as a ratio of structural components of stressed and unstressed syllables in the form [[sigma].
Burns (2006) surveyed ESL instructors who taught in the Australian Adult Migrant English Program and found that that many instructors desired more professional development and "were unsure, in particular, about teaching suprasegmental features" (p.
Content is arranged so that each volume is devoted to a particular broad subject, as follows: general issues and segmental phonology, suprasegmental and prosodic phonology, phonological processes, phonological interfaces, and phonology across languages.
vowels, consonants, syllables, words) and (2) the suprasegmental dimension (i.
What sets Kobayashi's book apart from previous works, however, is his use of modern phonological theories such as suprasegmental phonology and the most widely used constraint-based theory within phonology, optimality theory (OT).
These generalizations subsume both segmental and suprasegmental phenomena, e.
This is an obvious instance of the suprasegmental of timing that marks syntactically self-standing units of the discourse.
Many factors may influence a native speaker's judgment of a second or foreign language (FL) learner's accent including suprasegmental features such as stress, rhythm, and intonation (Munro, 1995).
Using an ELF approach to pronunciation instruction may not be the most appropriate choice for many Canadian ESL classrooms, where most learners will speak regularly with native speakers and would probably benefit from a heavier focus on suprasegmental instruction.