suprapatellar bursa

su·pra·pa·tel·lar bur·sa

[TA]
a large bursa between the inferior part of the femur and the tendon of the quadriceps femoris muscle. It usually communicates with the cavity of the knee joint and is pathologically distended with blood or synovial fluid in suprapatellar bursitis ("water on the knee").
Synonym(s): bursa suprapatellaris [TA]

su·pra·pa·tel·lar bur·sa

(sū'pră-pă-tel'ăr bŭr'să) [TA]
A large space between the lower part of the femur and the tendon of the quadriceps femoris muscle. It usually communicates with the cavity of the knee joint.
References in periodicals archive ?
A bursa around the knee was classified as present when there was more than 5 mm of synovial liquid in the suprapatellar bursa and as absent when there was less than 5 mm.[11] Other fluid-filled bursae were considered present or absent and described based on their locations.
High-resolution ultrasound findings include uniformly hyperechoic synovium based mass located in the suprapatellar bursa. Multiple finger-like globular and villous fronds can be seen extending from the base of the mass.
Communication with the joint recesses usually results in fluid accumulation in the suprapatellar bursa directly abutting the SPFP, whereas there is little or no communication with areas surrounding the IPFP.
Mild, villous, frond-like fatty subsynovial hyperplasia was present in the suprapatellar bursa, associated with joint effusion and synovial proliferation, which enhanced after iv administration of gadolinium.
There were fluid in infrapatellar fat pad and suprapatellar bursa as well.
Under the guide of an arthroscope, it was released from the inferior patella with a blunt needle drill in the following order: inner and outer groove, suprapatellar bursa, bilateral retinaculum, patellar joint, intercondylar fossa, bilateral compartment, and adhes- ions between the femur and the quadriceps.
In total, 30 patients presented joint swelling associated with floating patella syndrome and 9 patients presented no swelling; 28 patients had cavernous suprapatellar bursa. In addition, 32 patients experienced joint pain, and 21 patients had limited joint activities.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the right knee showed increased fluid in the suprapatellar bursa and joint.
This muscle presented a distal insertion at an average distance of 3.07cm above of the superior edge of the trochlea and an anterior insertion in proximal edge of the suprapatellar bursa. The number of bundles of each muscle varied from 2 to 7 bundles which, in its majority, had presented a vertical direction.
The bilateral suprapatellar bursa (SPB), deep infrapatellar bursa (DIPB), popliteal bursa (PB), and retrocalcaneal bursa (RCB) were imaged and measured for analysis.
Sonographic examination of both knees was performed by the EUB 6000 (Hitachi Medical Systems, Japan) with a high frequency linear array probe, and this revealed villous hyperechoic structures projecting into the suprapatellar effusion and a hyperechoic pseudo-mass lesion in the suprapatellar bursa in the right knee (Figure 4).
The vastus medialis was not split if its patellar insertion was not lower than the upper pole of the patella, and the suprapatellar bursa was only partially opened.