suprapatellar bursa

su·pra·pa·tel·lar bur·sa

[TA]
a large bursa between the inferior part of the femur and the tendon of the quadriceps femoris muscle. It usually communicates with the cavity of the knee joint and is pathologically distended with blood or synovial fluid in suprapatellar bursitis ("water on the knee").
Synonym(s): bursa suprapatellaris [TA]

suprapatellar bursa

an expansion of the synovial membrane of the knee that is a continuation of the articular cavity superiorly between the distal end of the shaft of the femur and the quadriceps femoris muscle and tendon. It provides a low-friction surface for the movement of knee tendons. See also subpopliteal recess.

su·pra·pa·tel·lar bur·sa

(sū'pră-pă-tel'ăr bŭr'să) [TA]
A large space between the lower part of the femur and the tendon of the quadriceps femoris muscle. It usually communicates with the cavity of the knee joint.

suprapatellar bursa

large, saccular, bursal-like extension of knee joint lining; lies between anterior inferior aspect of femur and inferior surface of quadriceps tendon
References in periodicals archive ?
High-resolution ultrasound findings include uniformly hyperechoic synovium based mass located in the suprapatellar bursa.
Under the guide of an arthroscope, it was released from the inferior patella with a blunt needle drill in the following order: inner and outer groove, suprapatellar bursa, bilateral retinaculum, patellar joint, intercondylar fossa, bilateral compartment, and adhes- ions between the femur and the quadriceps.
The adhesion mai- nly was in the suprapatellar bursa, bilateral ditch, and condyle.
The bilateral suprapatellar bursa (SPB), deep infrapatellar bursa (DIPB), popliteal bursa (PB), and retrocalcaneal bursa (RCB) were imaged and measured for analysis.
The examined lower extremity bursae included the bilateral suprapatellar bursa (SPB), deep infrapatellar bursa (DIPB), popliteal bursa (PB), and retrocalcaneal bursa (RCB).
In total, 30 patients presented joint swelling associated with floating patella syndrome and 9 patients presented no swelling; 28 patients had cavernous suprapatellar bursa.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the right knee showed increased fluid in the suprapatellar bursa and joint.
Our results suggest that the same size and the relations of this with the suprapatellar bursa can be directly related with the test of the muscular mass of the member of the individual, therefore when it works to increase muscular tonus of the quadriceps, it is also, in indirect way, increasing the articular muscle of the knee and improving its performance in the articular cavity.
The vastus medialis was not split if its patellar insertion was not lower than the upper pole of the patella, and the suprapatellar bursa was only partially opened.
Sonographic examination of both knees was performed by the EUB 6000 (Hitachi Medical Systems, Japan) with a high frequency linear array probe, and this revealed villous hyperechoic structures projecting into the suprapatellar effusion and a hyperechoic pseudo-mass lesion in the suprapatellar bursa in the right knee (Figure 4).
When she was reevaluated, in addition to arthritis of both knees, swelling and erythema in the suprapatellar bursa was noted.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the left knee revealed extensive hyperin-tense synovial thickening and erosive changes within the joint cavity, including all knee compartments and the suprapatellar bursa on T2-weighted images (Figures 2, 3).