supramarginal

su·pra·mar·gin·al

(sū'pră-mar'jin-ăl),
Above any margin; denoting especially the supramarginal gyrus.

supramarginal

(soo″pră-măr′jĭn-ăl) [″ + marginalis, border]
Located above any border.
References in periodicals archive ?
They're often observed in parts of the brain that are the newest, in evolutionary terms: the prefrontal cortex, which is responsible for advanced processing; the bilateral supramarginal gyri, which play a role in linking words and meanings; and the anterior cingulate.
More recently, we learnt about another area of the brain, the right supramarginal gyrus, [3] which enables humans to recognise and overcome emotional egocentricity when attempting to imagine or understand the perspective of someone else.
559, 571-572, 694) maintains that only rents of factors actually used in production, whether marginal or supramarginal, must be positive.
Las asociaciones entre la conectividad y el desempeno involucraron a la CI, al giro frontal inferior y superior, el PT y el giro medial occipital, para la precision interoceptiva; GFI, HP, amigdala, pHP, CI, y el giro supramarginal, para el aprendizaje interoceptivo; el HP, amigdala y GFI para la conciencia interoceptiva.
While intervention shows changes in brain activation for the eight different patients, it was found that an improvement in the treatment is generally associated with an activation on the left supramarginal gyrus and the right precuneus.
The present study evaluated subjects' WM with n-back tasks based on verbal materials, and it is generally believed that the parietal lobe (supramarginal gyrus) is an important brain area of voice WM; an impairment in this brain area can cause a decrease in patients' auditory-verbal memory span, so patients are unable to maintain the linguistic sequence in WM.
(44) A subsequent study showed that binge drinking adolescents had greater activation in the medial frontal gyrus (meFG), SFG, IPL, and supramarginal gyrus, as well as less activation in the middle occipital gyrus, when compared with control subjects.
Different from NS, in HS, positive correlations between ReHo/DC and TEI/TEE were observed in the CAL, supramarginal gyrus (SMG), PFC, and insula, while negative correlations were observed in the CPL, MCC, supplementary motor area (SMA), PreC, postcentral gyrus (PostC), fusiform gyrus, and thalamus (Table 3; Figure 5).
As shown in Figure 1 and Table 2, the ReHo values were higher in depressed patients in the right superior temporal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, triangular part of the right inferior frontal gyrus, orbital part of the right inferior frontal gyrus, right superior occipital gyrus, right middle occipital gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate, and paracingulate gyri, and values were reduced in the right fusiform gyrus, left middle occipital gyrus, left lingual gyrus, and left inferior parietal except for the supramarginal and angular gyri.
The reduced cortical thickness was reported in pruning (synapse elimination/maturation) regions of the cortex in young adults, for example, in the superior frontal and temporal gyri, as well as in the regions that have finalized their maturation (precentral and supramarginal gyri).
Lateralized cortical changes were observed in the right rectal gyrus and precuneus and in the left supramarginal gyrus, paracentral lobule, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, caudate, and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC).