suppression amblyopia

sup·pres·sion am·bly·o·pi·a

suppression of the central vision in one eye when the images from the two eyes are so different that they cannot be fused into one. This may be due to: 1) faulty image formation (sensory amblyopia); 2) a large difference in refraction between the two eyes (anisometropic amblyopia); or 3) the two eyes, pointing in different directions (strabismic amblyopia). Most suppression amblyopia can be reversed if appropriately treated before age 6 years.

suppression amblyopia

a partial loss of vision, usually in one eye, caused by cortical suppression of central vision to prevent diplopia. It occurs commonly in strabismus in the eye that deviates and does not fixate. Early recognition of strabismus and amblyopia is essential because occlusive therapy that forces use of the bad eye may dramatically improve the child's vision if begun early. It becomes progressively less effective with increasing age but may improve vision even up to 9 years of age. Without therapy, near-blindness in the affected eye may result, but common acuity loss is 20/40 to 20/400.

sup·pres·sion am·bly·o·pi·a

(sŭ-presh'ŭn am'blē-ō'pē-ă)
Suppression of the central vision in one eye when the images from the two eyes are so different that they cannot be fused into one. This may be due to: 1) faulty image formation (sensory amblyopia); 2) a large difference in refraction between the two eyes (anisometropic amblyopia); or 3) the two eyes pointing in different directions (strabismic amblyopia). Most suppression cases can be reversed if appropriately treated in patients younger than 12 years old; condition may improve with better results in patients who are younger at onset of therapy.