suppression


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suppression

 [sŭ-presh´un]
the act of holding back or checking.
1. the stopping or inhibition of something, such as a secretion, excretion, normal discharge, or other function.
2. in psychiatry, conscious inhibition of an unacceptable impulse or idea as contrasted with repression, which is unconscious.
3. in genetics, a second mutation occurring at a site different from the first mutation site and able to mask or suppress the phenotypic expression of the first mutation; the organism appears to be reverted but is in fact doubly mutant.
4. inhibition of the erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium to prevent clinical attacks of malaria; used for prophylaxis.
5. cortical inhibition of perception of objects in all or part of the visual field of one eye during binocular vision.
bone marrow suppression reduction of the cell-forming functions of bone marrow, such as by a drug or because of replacement of the marrow by a disease process. Called also myelophthisis and myelosuppression.
labor suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as controlling uterine contractions prior to 37 weeks of gestation to prevent preterm birth. See also labor.
lactation suppression in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as facilitating the cessation of lactation and minimizing breast engorgement after childbirth.
overdrive suppression the suppression of intrinsic cellular automaticity by a rapid outside stimulus. In cardiology this refers to the inhibitory effect of a faster pacemaker on a slower pacemaker. The faster rate causes an accumulation of intracellular sodium, stimulating the sodium-potassium pump, which hyperpolarizes the cell so that it takes longer to reach threshold potential. This phenomenon is present in healthy His-Purkinje cells but decreases with a decrease in membrane potential and loss of fast sodium channels.

sup·pres·sion

(sŭ-presh'ŭn),
1. Deliberately excluding from conscious thought.
See also: epistasis. Compare: repression.
2. Arrest of the secretion of a fluid, such as urine or bile.
See also: epistasis. Compare: retention (2).
3. Checking of an abnormal flow or discharge, as in suppression of a hemorrhage.
See also: epistasis.
4. The effect of a second mutation that overwrites a phenotypic change caused by a previous mutation at a different point on the chromosome.
See also: epistasis.
5. Inhibition of vision in one eye when dissimilar images fall on corresponding retinal points.
6. The attenuation or arrest of an immune response.
[L. subprimo (subp-), pp. -pressus, to press down]

suppression

(sə-prĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of suppressing.
2. The state of being suppressed.
3. Psychiatry Conscious exclusion of unacceptable desires, thoughts, or memories from the mind.
4. Genetics The inhibition of gene expression.

suppression

Slowing down, restraint, inhibition Psychiatry The conscious effort to control and conceal unacceptable impulses, thoughts, feelings, acts

sup·pres·sion

(sŭ-presh'ŭn)
1. Deliberate exclusion from conscious thought.
Compare: repression
2. Arrest of the secretion of a fluid, such as urine or bile.
Compare: retention (2)
3. Checking of an abnormal flow or discharge, as in suppression of a hemorrhage.
See also: epistasis
4. The effect of a second mutation, which overwrites a phenotypic change caused by a previous mutation at a different point on the chromosome.
5. Inhibition of vision in one eye when dissimilar images fall on corresponding retinal points.
[L. subprimo, pp. -pressus, to press down]

suppression

  1. failure to develop any organ or structure.
  2. (genetics) the mechanism whereby the effects of a primary MUTATION are suppressed or negated by a second mutation, the SUPPRESSOR MUTATION, that occurs at a different site from that of the primary mutation. Thus a function lost by a primary mutation can be totally or partially restored by a suppressor mutation. Suppression may be intergenic, where the suppressor mutation occurs in a different GENE from that of the primary mutation, or intragenic, where the suppressor mutation occurs at a different site in the same gene.

suppression 

The process by which the brain inhibits the retinal image (or part of it) of one eye, when both eyes are simultaneously stimulated. This occurs to avoid diplopia as in strabismus, in uncorrected anisometropia, in retinal rivalry, etc. Syn. suspenopsia (this term actually refers to voluntary suppression as occurs, for example, when using a monocular microscope with one eye); suspension (most often used when referring to partial suppression). See cheiroscope; physiological diplopia; Javal's grid; Mallett fixation disparity unit; Remy separator; retinal rivalry; Bagolini lens test; four prism dioptre base out test; FRIEND test; Turville infinity balance test; Worth's four dot test; vectogram.

sup·pres·sion

(sŭ-presh'ŭn)
1. Deliberately excluding from conscious thought.
2. Arrest of the secretion of a fluid, such as urine or bile.
Compare: retention (3)
[L. subprimo (subp-), pp. -pressus, to press down]
References in periodicals archive ?
Flexible sprinklers are the most selling fire suppression systems
Two independent radiologists performed the qualitative analysis for fat suppression uniformity and lesion conspicuity on T2 Dixon water-only and SPAIR images.
September 14, 2017: Perdue renews call for Congress to fix "fire borrowing" problem after wildland fire suppression costs exceed $2 billion
Individuals who had a particular variation in a specific gene (platelet derived growth factor D; PDGFD) had a markedly increased risk of adrenal suppression, both in the children with asthma and adults with COPD.
Among 136,759 persons who were in care in 2014, but did not achieve sustained viral suppression, 89,245 (65%) had at least one viral load test result of >1,500 copies/mL in 2014.
To summarize, this study was designed to investigate the relation between the effect of articulatory suppression on the LHT and severities of social impairments among children with ASD.
Visual inspection suggested greater variability in patients compared to HCs with some patients showing less suppression (see Figure 2).
An APD detective assigned as liaison with the Alaska Information Analysis Center moved to the Crime Suppression Division as a dedicated Task Force Officer.
While physical intimidation and open discrimination based on race, origin or age were prevalent many years ago, voter suppression tactics have become a lot more subtle nowadays.
The IUD appears to be more effective than OCs for menstrual suppression. OCs can cause sporadic spotting and/or periods in the first year of use, and some women report that it's similar to having a period.
This article discusses significant reliability issues with conventional fire suppression systems and presents several sample fire case studies that highlight these issues.
Based on the above, this study aimed to evaluate the performance of common bean cultivated under the application of osmoprotectants based on extracts of marine algae of the genus Durvillaea potatorum in the winter crop season, with occurrence or not of water suppression.