suppress

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suppress

(sə-prĕs′)
v.
1. To curtail or inhibit the activity of something, such as the immune system or a gene.
2. To deliberately exclude unacceptable desires or thoughts from the mind.
3. To reduce the incidence or severity of a condition or symptom.

suppress

(sŭ-pres′) [L. suppressus, pressed down, fr. supprimere, to press down]
1. To hold in check or inhibit, e.g., as a suppressive therapy for a chronic infection.
2. In psychology, to exclude from consciousness.
suppressive (-pres′iv), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Administration of tetrandrine suppresses neovascularization of the choroidal capillary, which is facilitated by VEGF in culture (Kobayashi et al.
Once the gene that suppresses Schwann cell growth is "mapped" or located, scientists can begin to develop gene therapy to control the overproduction of these cells in individuals with acoustic neurinoma.
Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate suppresses estradiol and ovulation in cycling rats.
In fact, scientists have just devised an anti-antioxidant dietary therapy that suppresses breast cancer in rodents.
Now, investigators from the University of Washington in Seattle and Vanderbilt Unive rsity School of Medicine in Nashville have shown that adding a working BRCA1 to some cancer cells inhibits their proliferation and suppresses tumor growth.
This activity suppresses the infection without harming the infected cells.
After a frustrating, almost decade-long quest for HIV-fighting molecules naturally secreted by the body's immune cells, investigators have finally found a quartet of proteins that suppresses the replication of the deadly AIDS virus in infected cells.
On the left side, the Shh protein spurs cNR-1 protein synthesis, while on the right side, a molecule called activin suppresses synthesis of Shh and stimulates production of cAct-RIIa.
The substance, known as cell antiviral factor (CAF), suppresses the virus' ability to spread from cell to cell through the immune system.
For their experiments, Rudolf Jaenisch, Kreidberg, and their fellow Whitehead scientists created a special "knockout" mouse strain in which offspring carried one or two faulty copies of a gene that normally "suppresses" the development of Wilms' tumor.
More potent than some of the body's natural chemical messengers, TCDD suppresses the immune system of mice at least 100 times more effectively than corticosterone, a hormone known for that effect, dioxin researchers say.