supplement

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supplement

(sŭp′lə-mənt)
sup′ple·men·tar′i·ty (-târ′ĭ-tē) n.
sup′ple·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -trē), sup′ple·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
sup′ple·men·ta′tion (-mĕn-tā′shən) n.

supplement

(sup'le-ment?) [L. supplementum, an addition]
1. Something added to a food or a diet to increase its nutritional value. Synonym: oral nutritional supplement
2. To add.
supplemental (sup?le-ment'al), adjective

sup·ple·ment

(sŭplĕ-mĕnt)
Agent or procedure added to complete, extend, or reinforce something.
[L. supplementum, fr. suppleo, to fill, + -mentum, noun suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
For over a decade pet supplements have been steady and at times outstanding pet market performers, maintaining momentum thanks the overall pet market's driving focus on health and wellness, increased attention to age- and obesity-related pet health conditions and risks, the strengthening embrace of nutrition as part of a preventative health and wellness routine, and ongoing high-level interest in functional ingredients and products targeting specific health conditions.
Sibutramine also showed up in 269 weight loss supplements, and sibutramine analogues appeared in another 20.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA)--but there are no such rules that apply to dietary supplements. Supplements can be sold without receiving any sort of approval, although the FDA can recall supplements if they're proven to be unsafe.
adults aged 55+ take dietary supplements, followed by those aged 35-54 (77%) and 18-34 (69%).
This dietary data was utilized in order to obtain the frequency of supplements which contain vitamin D, as well as, to examine the reasons why vitamin D supplements are consumed.
Get more information on supplements by visiting the organizations that test these products online.
Fabricant says supplements do not have to be proven safe or effective before ending up on your supermarket or drugstore shelf.
In some earlier studies, the two supplements had eased the pain and other symptoms of osteoarthritis, while in other studies they were ineffective.
Since many commercial probiotic supplements contain bacteria related to those that reduce oxalate, Daniel and his team decided to test several supplements.