supplement

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supplement

(sŭp′lə-mənt)
sup′ple·men·tar′i·ty (-târ′ĭ-tē) n.
sup′ple·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -trē), sup′ple·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
sup′ple·men·ta′tion (-mĕn-tā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

supplement

(sup'le-ment?) [L. supplementum, an addition]
1. Something added to a food or a diet to increase its nutritional value. Synonym: oral nutritional supplement
2. To add.
supplemental (sup?le-ment'al), adjective
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

sup·ple·ment

(sŭplĕ-mĕnt)
Agent or procedure added to complete, extend, or reinforce something.
[L. supplementum, fr. suppleo, to fill, + -mentum, noun suffix]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the likelihood that correlations between complementarity and supplementarity are somewhat inflated by common method bias, this study represents a conservative test of the orthogonality of these constructs.
They argue that the whole history of money can be understood as a general process of "supplementarity," in which successively more complex forms of money are created (i.e., coinage, bills of exchange, endorsed discounted notes, etc.) that enhance its "operation and power" in society [Ezzamel and Hoskin, 2002, p.
Attending to this practice, I would argue, might involve reading advertising not as a secondary effect, but as a primary formation within the structure of the novel, which, in articulating the supplementarity of two divergent modes of writing, produces the one in relation to the other.
(10) To take up the sonnets in their entirety was thus to address precisely those problems of supplementarity that were at the heart of both translation and women's position in the literary market.
In his famous essay 'The novel today', Coetzee again addresses the question of history, this time focusing on the novel rather than narrative: In times of intense ideological pressure like the present, when the space in which the novel and history normally coexist like two cows on the same pasture, each minding its own business, is squeezed almost to nothing, the novel, it seems to me, has only two options: supplementarity or rivalry ...
The complications that contingency and supplementarity bring to interdisciplinary epistemology are complicated enough, even if these days they are likely to be taken for granted.
supplementarity, a matter of substitution and deferral.
Here's an example, from her discussion of Sidney Owenson's celebrated novel of 1806, The Wild Irish Girl: "Shifts between the text's romance, novelistic, and propagandistic registers; appear most obviously in its supplementarity, whereby a digressive paratext insistently interrupts the narrative with historical data culled from eighteenth-century antiquarianism" (161).
In Chapter 3 ("Framing, Orality, Origins") the bottle is deconstruction, and the notion that old humanist types are filled with anxiety at the prospect of supplementarity, scapegoats, shifting frames, and elusive origins is given the lie as Parr gallops through the perilous textual field astride bis Derridean mount.

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