supplement


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supplement

(sŭp′lə-mənt)
sup′ple·men·tar′i·ty (-târ′ĭ-tē) n.
sup′ple·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -trē), sup′ple·men′tal (-mĕn′tl) adj.
sup′ple·men·ta′tion (-mĕn-tā′shən) n.

supplement

(sup'le-ment?) [L. supplementum, an addition]
1. Something added to a food or a diet to increase its nutritional value. Synonym: oral nutritional supplement
2. To add.
supplemental (sup?le-ment'al), adjective

sup·ple·ment

(sŭplĕ-mĕnt)
Agent or procedure added to complete, extend, or reinforce something.
[L. supplementum, fr. suppleo, to fill, + -mentum, noun suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
To efficiently manage time, at the end of the orientation class, participants signed up for the nutrition class; upon completion of the nutrition class, participants signed up for the supplements class; and at the end of the supplements class, participants signed up for the exercise class.
If you choose to purchase supplements, we advise you to research them thoroughly and be fully aware of what you're getting.
Utah's self-starting, entrepreneurial streak also plays a role in Utah's stronghold on the supplement industry, according to Chang.
* Supplement users among the elderly are more likely than nonusers to be physically active and to follow current dietary advice related to salt, fat, cholesterol, sugar, caffeine and fiber intake.
- Millennials, Homes with Children Skew High for Pet Supplement Use
"If the supplement passes their tests, they provide their own stamp of verification on the supplement.
adults--87%--have overall confidence in the safety, quality, and effectiveness of dietary supplements, consistent with last year's data and up from 84% in 2009.
Online stores are driving the growth of the supplement industry for a number of reasons.
The second most consumed dietary supplement was the vitamin D supplement.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA), dietary supplements are not subject to the same level of scrutiny.
WASHINGTON -- Further evidence of the strength of the vitamin market comes from a recent survey showing that the use of dietary supplements is at an all-time high among American adults.
So, it seems only natural that the same curiosity might apply to dietary supplements. This explains the emergence of whole food dietary supplements, such as vitamins, minerals, and botanicals that promise they originate from more "whole" sources.