supine

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supine

 [soo´pīn]
lying with the face upward, or on the dorsal surface.
Supine position. From Lammon et al., 1995.

su·pine

(sū-pīn'), Although this word is more correctly accented on the first syllable, the pronunciation shown is usual in the U.S.
1. Denoting the body when lying face upward.
2. Supination of the forearm or of the foot.
[L. supinus]

supine

Imaging adjective Pertaining to a posture in which the anterior portion of the body faces upward, the torso is aligned parallel to the reference surface, and hips and knees extended Medtalk Lying on the back. See Position.

su·pine

(sū'pīn, sū-pīn')
1. Denoting the body when lying face upward; opposite of prone.
2. Supination of the forearm or of the foot.
Synonym(s): dorsal recumbent position.
[L. supinus]

supine

Lying on the back with the face upwards.

su·pine

(sū'pīn)
1. Denoting the body when lying face upward.
2. Supination of the forearm or of the foot.
[L. supinus]
References in periodicals archive ?
As a consequence of the restrictions in (5a) and (5c), other indefinite modifiers are incompatible with supine nouns, as in (5e).
Adjectives compatible with an agentive reading may modify supine nouns, but they occur only on the right of the noun, as in (5f), whereas regular nouns, including infinitive-based nouns, may have the adjective on the left or on the right.
The examples in (5) show that supine nouns, unlike infinitive nouns, undergo a deficient nominalization.
It appears that the supine is recognized as a nominal element only if it moves to a D occupied by a default article -l, as in (6d).
Nouns based on supine forms do not always reach this categorial definition.
This section approaches de-supine constructions in which the supine does not raise to a D -l.
The grammatical version of (2b) must eliminate the definite article from the supine form and change the case of the object from genitive to accusative.
On the other hand, small adverbs may (although rarely) modify the supine form in de constructions, which is not possible in DP structures, as shown in (8).
The facts in (2b), (7), and (8) show that in de constructions the supine form behaves like a verb: it rules out the definite article, it takes a direct object in the accusative, and it can be modified by adverbs.
Since de constructions function as clausal units, the supine must be contained in a verbal phrase.
A priori we can posit an analysis with supine raising to "light v," since all verbs raise overtly in Romanian.
In the case of supine clauses, a new factor arises: the supine has a lexically deficient [N] feature that needs further checking in syntax.