supinate


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

supinate

 [soo´pĭ´nāt]
the act of turning the palm forward or upward, or of raising the medial margin of the foot.

su·pi·nate

(sū'pi-nāt),
1. To assume, or to be placed in, a supine (that is, face upward) position.
2. To perform supination of the forearm or of the foot.
[L. supino, pp. -atus, to bend backwards, place on back, fr. supinus, supine]

supinate

/su·pi·nate/ (soo´pĭ-nāt) to assume or place in a supine position.

supinate

(so͞o′pə-nāt′)
v. supi·nated, supi·nating, supi·nates
v.tr.
1. To turn or rotate (the hand or forearm) so that the palm faces up or forward.
2. To turn or rotate (the foot) by adduction and inversion so that the outer edge of the sole bears the body's weight.
v.intr.
To be supinated; undergo supination.

su′pi·na′tion n.

su·pi·nate

(sū'pi-nāt)
1. To assume, or to be placed in, a supine (face upward) position.
2. To perform supination of the forearm or of the foot.
[L. supino, pp. -atus, to bend backwards, place on back, fr. supinus, supine]

supinate

assume/move into a supine position
References in periodicals archive ?
to allow the foot to supinate into a position of increased sagittal plane stability during the propulsive phase of gait, or during dancers' releve.
Inside the bursa, which is self-contained like a deflated balloon, is a small amount of fluid allowing the skin to move over the elbow as it flexes, extends, pronates and supinates.
The powered wrist flexes and extends as well as pronates and supinates and provides a combined lateral and medial deviation capability.
A patient who supinates will benefit from a less stable, more cushioned shoe providing more impact resistant materials such as gel and air.
Forearm supination (supination): The participant grasps a handle in a neutral forearm position and supinates the forearm, using muscles in the hand, forearm, and upper arm.
15) In this maneuver, the patient pronates and supinates the arm in full extension causing compression of the radiocapitellar joint due to dynamic muscle forces, and if found to be painful, it is suggestive of an OCD lesion of the capitellum.
The proximal fragment supinates and the distal fragment pronates which is seen in the X-Ray as a striking discrepancy in the width of the interosseous space between the proximal and distal fragments.
This radial insertion of APB, FPB, and opponens pollicis aids in thumb pronation, which is balanced out by the ulnar insertion of the adductor pollicis, which supinates.