supervention


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supervention

(soo″pĕr-vĕn′shŭn) [L. superventio, a coming over]
The development of an additional condition as a complication to an existing disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
the Herr General the objects at the party and the croupiers affect the environment mostly by intention processes (1a2a2b2c2d2e2f3a3c10) and to a lesser degree by supervention processes (3b3d).
That is not to say that the Torah was revealed by God to Ezra, in effective supervention of the traditional revelation to Moses on Mount Sinai.
Therefore, the supervention of deontology on consequentialism, to employ a physicalistic metaphor, does not bankrupt the theoretic importance of deontology.
The several cases, such as `A Woman's Last Word', in which we can observe a process of creation continuing after the first edition (as contrasted with the supervention of unhappy second thoughts) go to support the choice of the last authoritative text as copy-text rather than, as with the Longman edition, the first.
The supervention of perception and thought does not suppress but rather enhances the significance of a human being's sexual nature in the execution of his or her natural functioning.
In each of these three, most older people had a secure position, if never one of idyllic patriarchalism, lived surrounded by their families if not in recent times sharing households with them, and, with important exceptions, in a condition of security, progressing steadily towards that `Third Age'(*) condition which is now beginning to describe their general situation before the supervention of the Fourth and final episode of decrepitude and death.