superjacent


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superjacent

 [soo″per-ja´sent]
located just above.

superjacent

/su·per·ja·cent/ (soo″per-ja´sent) located just above.

superjacent

Lying immediately above or upon something.

superjacent

located just above.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although this essay has focused on the lack of subjective territorial jurisdiction of the United States over an outer continental shelf and superjacent waters and why 18 U.
bifurcation of the secondary vein with the superjacent secondary vein
The mixed volcaniclastic nature of the bed is also clearly defined in its carbonate content that is consistently lower than 5 %, in contrast to values of 25 to 40 % in the infrajacent and superjacent marl and limestone layers.
The close proximity of most Alibates chert to opalized and calichified zones in the superjacent Miocene-Pliocene Ogallala Formation suggests that local chertification may have been a by-product of the calichification process.
The Convention on the Continental Shelf says that the term refers: (i) to the seabed and subsoil of the submarine areas adjacent to the coast but outside the area of the territorial sea, to a depth of 200 metres or, beyond that limit, to where the depth of the superjacent waters admits of the exploration of the natural resources of the said areas; (ii) to the seabed and subsoil of similar submarine areas adjacent to the coasts of islands'.
the seabed and subsoil of the submarine areas adjacent to the coast but outside the area of the territorial sea, to a depth of 200 meters or, beyond that limit, to where the depth of the superjacent waters admits of the exploitation of the natural resources of the said areas.
So the occupants are anonymous, though there are two children, ten adults and one infant, and the sad facts of their lives can be inferred from the superjacent words.
According to international law including UNCLOS (UN Convention on the Law of the Sea), a coastal state's rights over the continental shelf do not affect the legal status of the superjacent waters or of the air space above those waters, nor do they affect foreign ships' navigation freedom in the coastal state's EEZ (exclusive economic zone) and on the high seas, or their innocent passage through the coastal state's territorial sea as supported by international law,' the Chinese official said.
The Republic's EEZ is recognised by the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea, which provides that a coastal state has sovereign rights in its EEZ to explore, develop and preserve the natural resources, whether living or non-living, of the waters superjacent to the seabed and of the seabed and its subsoil (Article 65, subparagraph 1a).
Chile and Ecuador in their observations submitted to the Commission contended that the rights of the coastal State over its continental shelf went beyond just "control" and "jurisdiction"; Chile, in addition, called for "sovereignty" over both the continental shelf and superjacent waters.