superior

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superior

 [soo-pe´re-or]
situated above, or directed upward; in official anatomic nomenclature, used in reference to the upper surface of an organ or other structure, or to a structure occupying a higher position.

su·per·i·or

(sū-pēr'ē-ŏr), [TA] In Latin phrases, this form of the adjective is used with masculine nouns (margo superior, plural margines superiores) and feminine nouns (facies superior, plural facies superiores). With neuter nouns the form superius is used (cornu superius, plural cornua superiora).
1. In human anatomy, situated nearer the vertex of the head in relation to a specific reference point; opposite of inferior. Synonym(s): cranial (2)
2. Situated above or directed upward.
[L. comparative of superus, above]

superior

/su·pe·ri·or/ (soo-pēr´e-or) situated above, or directed upward.

superior

(so͝o-pîr′ē-ər)
adj.
1. Situated above or directed upward.
2. Situated nearer the top of the head.

su·pe′ri·or′i·ty (-ôr′ĭ-tē) n.
su·pe′ri·or·ly adv.

superior

[səpir′ē·ər]
Etymology: L, higher
situated above or oriented toward a higher place, as the head is superior to the torso. Compare inferior.

su·pe·ri·or

(sŭ-pēr'ē-ŏr) [TA]
1. Situated above or directed upward.
2. human anatomy Situated nearer the vertex of the head in relation to a specific reference point; opposite of inferior.
Synonym(s): cranial (2) .
[L. comparative of superus, above]

superior

Above, higher than, with reference to the upright body. Compare INFERIOR.

superior,

adj 1., positioned toward the head or above the referent. Also called
cranial or
cephalic. 2., being of higher quality.

su·per·i·or

(sŭ-pēr'ē-ŏr) [TA]
1. Situated above or directed upward.
2. human anatomy situated nearer the vertex of the head in relation to a specific reference point.
Synonym(s): cranial (2) .
[L. comparative of superus, above]

superior

situated above, or directed upward.

Patient discussion about superior

Q. I get shooting pains in my buttocks and both upper legs

A. Sounds like radicular pain (pain originating from injury to the roots of the nerves in the spinal column). Is it aggravated by coughing, straining, standing or sitting? Is it relieved by lying down.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/backpain.html and http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/backpain.html

Q. What are the presenting signs of ALS? Are the upper or lower extremeties affected initialilly?

A. The most common presenting sign of ALS is asymmetric limb weakness, usually starting with the hands (problems with pinching, writing, holding things etc.) shoulders (lifting arms above head etc.) or legs (problems walking).

Other presenting signs may be problems with speaking or swallowing, although these are less common.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/amyotrophiclateralsclerosis.html

Q. Hello friends, my uncle suffers from fibromyalgia and arthritis in his upper shoulder and hand. Hello friends, my uncle suffers from fibromyalgia and arthritis in his upper shoulder and hand...I told him he needs to exercise. Can some give me a list or a website with a couple of general exercises that includes a diagram (preferred)

A. Hello Daron, Eat only when hungry and not more than thrice a day. Include plenty of uncooked vegetables and fruits in each meal, preferably 50%. Chew each morsel at least 32 times to activate your body to generate signals of hunger/fullness. Obey these signals. Take light exercises and brisk walks regularly preferably twice a day. U will achieve what u have not even dreamt and that too in a reasonable time. Do not be in a hurry. Have him see a doctor, first, and then someone doing psy rehab. I can think of lots of good exercises for healthy people, but it seems like your uncle needs medical attention.

More discussions about superior
References in periodicals archive ?
This investigation has attempted to explore physician executives' choices of communicator styles when seeking to influence superiors whose own styles of communication are perceived to be attractive and unattractive.
Thus, the findings suggest that physician executives communicate differently in persuasive situations with superiors who interact with them in attractive and unattractive styles.
In addition to the differences outlined above, there are at least two important similarities in the way the physician executives in this study preferred to communicate persuasively with attractive and unattractive superiors.
By being attentive communicators, physician executives signal a willingness to provide responsive feedback to what their superiors and subordinates have to say during an influence attempt.
Respondents were instructed that the targets were superiors with whom they worked and interacted on a daily basis.
More specifically, the present investigation examined the impact of superiors who communicate in attractive and unattractive styles on physician executives' strategic maneuvers to gain compliance.
The results of the present investigation strongly suggest that superiors who as targets-of-influence communicate in attractive and unattractive styles differentially affect physician executives' strategic preferences.