superior sagittal sinus


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su·pe·ri·or sag·it·tal si·nus

[TA]
an unpaired dural venous sinus in the sagittal groove, beginning at the foramen caecum and terminating at the confluence of sinuses where it merges with the straight sinus; receives the superior cerebral veins and has lateral extensions, the lateral venous lacunae.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

su·pe·ri·or sag·it·tal si·nus

(sŭ-pēr'ē-ŏr saj'i-tăl sī'nŭs) [TA]
An unpaired dural venous sinus in the sagittal groove, beginning at the foramen caecum and terminating at the confluence of sinuses where it merges with the straight sinus; receives the superior cerebral veins and has lateral extensions, the lateral venous lacunae.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

superior sagittal sinus

A long unpaired midline channel through the superior margin of the falx cerebri. It begins in the front near the crista galli of the ethmoid bone, and it extends along the entire inner roof of the skull to the internal occipital protuberance in the back. Its posterior end, called the confluence of the sinuses, is dilated and usually joins the right transverse sinus; however, the other transverse sinus and the occipital sinus also communicate with the confluence of the sinuses. Tributaries of the superior sagittal sinus include ascending frontal cerebral veins, superior cerebral veins, diploic veins draining the skull bones, and a number of irregularly shaped venous lacunae. Numerous arachnoid granulations (sites of the return of water and filtrate from the cerebrospinal fluid) protrude into the superior sagittal sinus.
See also: sinus
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Superior sagittal sinus, straight sinus and internal cerebral veins are consistently seen on MRV with slight variation of inferior sagittal sinus.
Six other patients had an epidural abscess alone (15.4%), five had a subdural abscess (12.8%), four had an intracerebral abscess (10.3%), one had both an epidural abscess and Pott's puffy tumor (2.6%), one had Pott's puffy tumor alone, and one had superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (table 3).
Superficial cortical veins drain into superior sagittal sinus against the blood flow in sinus, thus causing turbulation in the blood stream that is further aggravated by the presence of fibrous septa present at inferior angle of the sinus.
In this study the most common site of sinovenous occlusion was in superior sagittal sinus. One patient had cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to skin infection of dangerous area of face.
In MRV, superior sagittal sinus was observed in 31 (60.8%) patients, transverse sinus in 40 (78.4%), sigmoid sinus in 16 (31.4%) patients, and cavernous sinus involvement in 1 (2%).
The most common clinical symptom, predisposing factor, involved sinus, and common underlying disorder was headache (95.2%), taking OCP (52.4%), superior sagittal sinus (71.4%), and infraction (47.6%) respectively.
Craniotomy is generally performed around the vertex, allowing for access to all portions of the superior sagittal sinus, though careful intraprocedural positioning is required to adequately position the head above the heart to promote venous drainage while minimizing the risk for air emboli formation (Ekseth et al.).
The sinus thrombosis resulted in an increase in pressure in the superior sagittal sinus and a decrease in CSF absorption by arachnoid villi.
Taking attention to protecting superior sagittal sinus and avoiding rupture of the cyst, the neurosurgeon totally resected the tumor.
Two patients showed superior sagittal sinus thrombosis and one revealed left transverse sinus thrombosis and other patient showed thrombosis in transverse and sigmoid sinuses.

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